Torture in  [Ecuador]  [other countries]
Human Trafficking in  [Ecuador]  [other countries]
Street Children in  [Ecuador]  [other countries]
Child Prostitution in  [Ecuador]  [other countries]
 

Human Trafficking & Modern-day Slavery

In the early years of the 21st Century                                                  gvnet.com/humantrafficking/Ecuador.htm

Republic of Ecuador

Ecuador is substantially dependent on its petroleum resources, which have accounted for more than half of the country's export earnings and one-fourth of public sector revenues in recent years.

From 2002-06 the economy grew 5.5%, the highest five-year average in 25 years. The poverty rate declined but remained high at 38% in 2006.  [The World Factbook, U.S.C.I.A. 2009]

Description: Description: Ecuador

Ecuador is a source, transit, and destination country for men, women, and children trafficked for the purposes of commercial sexual exploitation and forced labor. The majority of trafficking victims are believed to be children trafficked within the country from border and central highland areas to urban centers for commercial sexual exploitation as well as for domestic servitude, forced begging, and forced labor in mines and other hazardous work.   - U.S. State Dept Trafficking in Persons Report, June, 2009   [full country report]

 

 

CAUTION:  The following links have been culled from the web to illuminate the situation in Ecuador.  Some of these links may lead to websites that present allegations that are unsubstantiated or even false.  No attempt has been made to validate their authenticity or to verify their content.

*** FEATURED ARTICLE ***

Smuggled Women, Modern Slaves, Tell Their Tales in New York

Daniela Gerson, The New York Sun, May 18, 2005

www.nysun.com/new-york/smuggled-women-modern-slaves-tell-their-tales/13991/

[accessed 3 February 2011]

Just weeks ago, the women said, they suffered thirst, hunger, and other abuses from smugglers, who had shepherded them from small villages in Ecuador to "stash houses" in Los Angeles, where they were held captive.

 

*** ARCHIVES ***

U.S. Report On Human Trafficking Reveals  Scope Of Modern-Day Slavery

David Gollust, Voice of America VOA News, Washington DC, June 3, 2005

perspicacityonline.com/Articles/2005/06/Modernslavery050603.htm

At one time this article had been archived and may possibly still be accessible [here]

Mr. Miller said that since the new report was compiled, one Third Tier country, Ecuador, has already taken action, with its congress this week approving changes in the country's criminal code to deal with trafficking.

Smuggled Women, Modern Slaves, Tell Their Tales in New York

Daniela Gerson, The New York Sun, May 18, 2005

www.nysun.com/new-york/smuggled-women-modern-slaves-tell-their-tales/13991/

[accessed 3 February 2011]

Just weeks ago, the women said, they suffered thirst, hunger, and other abuses from smugglers, who had shepherded them from small villages in Ecuador to "stash houses" in Los Angeles, where they were held captive.

Annual Report Of Activities By The Anti-Trafficking In Persons Section Of The Organization Of American States - April 2005 To March 2006 [DOC]

Organization Of American States, Inter-American Commission Of Women, 27 March 2006 -- Original: Spanish

scm.oas.org/doc_public/ENGLISH/HIST_06/MJ00334E08.DOC

[accessed 8 September 2014]

ECUADOR - On August 25 and 26, the Government of Ecuador and the OAS organized a training and awareness-raising seminar on trafficking in persons, held at the Supreme Court building in Quito. The OAS was assisted at this event by Ecuador’s Ministries of Foreign Affairs and of Labor and Employment. Other sponsors included the ILO, the American Bar Association’s Latin America and Caribbean Law Initiative, and the embassy of the United States in Quito. More than a hundred individuals attended this event, including a large number of officials from the Ecuadorian government. In addition to experts from Ecuador and the United States, the meeting included experts from Panama, Peru, and Colombia.

The Protection Project - Ecuador

The Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS), The Johns Hopkins University

www.protectionproject.org/human_rights_reports/report_documents/ecuador.doc

[accessed 2009]

NEW WEBSITE at www.protectionproject.org/country-reports/

[accessed 22 February 2016]

FORMS OF TRAFFICKING - Ecuadorians have been trafficked into the sex industry in Venezuela. Most Ecuadoran children trafficked into Venezuela come from the provinces of Chimborazo and Canar in the Andean region, a predominately indigenous area.  Children from Ecuador who are either sold by their parents or lured by false employment opportunities are trafficked for work in domestic service or prostitution in Venezuela.

Freedom House Country Report - Political Rights: 3   Civil Liberties: 3   Status: Partly Free

2009 Edition

www.freedomhouse.org/report/freedom-world/2009/ecuador

[accessed 26 June 2012]

Human Rights Overview

Human Rights Watch

www.hrw.org/americas/ecuador

[accessed 3 February 2011]

U.S. Library of Congress - Country Study

Library of Congress Call Number F3708 .E383 1991

www.loc.gov/collections/country-studies/?q=F3708+.E383+

[accessed 4 June 2017]

Four Nations Move Against Trafficking in Response to U.S. Report

Distributed by the Bureau of International Information Programs, U.S. Department of State, 10 September 2004

iipdigital.usembassy.gov/st/english/texttrans/2004/09/20040910174056cmretrop0.6162226.html#axzz3Ceikh97X

[accessed 8 September 2014]

Bangladesh, Ecuador, Guyana and Sierra Leone have acted rapidly over the last few months to reduce human trafficking in their borders. In so doing, they have avoided U.S.-imposed sanctions, according to a White House announcement September 10.

Tainted Harvest - Child Labor and Obstacles to Organizing on Ecuador's Banana Plantations

Human Rights Watch, April 2002

www.hrw.org/reports/2002/ecuador/ecuad0402-01.htm#P234_12118

[accessed 3 February 2011]

CHILD WORKERS - Human Rights Watch interviewed forty-five children who had worked or were working on banana plantations in Ecuador. Forty-one of them began in the banana sector between the ages of eight and thirteen, most starting at ages ten or eleven. They described workdays of twelve hours on average and hazardous conditions that violated their human rights, including dangerous tasks detrimental to their physical and psychological well-being. The children reported being exposed to pesticides, using sharp tools, hauling heavy loads of bananas from the fields to the packing plants, lacking potable water and restroom facilities, and experiencing sexual harassment.

Ecuador appoints child labour inspectors

Anti-Slavery International, 16 April 2004

At one time this article had been archived and may possibly still be accessible [here]

[accessed 4 September 2011]

Ecuador's Labour Ministry has appointed 12 child labour inspectors as of 2 April; a positive move in a country that, up until late last year, had none.  It has taken two years for any progress to be made in this area. In spring 2002, a Human Rights Watch report highlighted the Government's failure to implement international labour standards and found there were no child labour inspectors, even though the law calls for 22 - one for each province.

Trafficking and Sexual Exploitation Between Venezuela and Ecuador

Survivors' Rights International, July 17, 2003

At one time this article had been archived and may possibly still be accessible [here]

[accessed 4 September 2011]

BACKGROUND - Women and children are also trafficked into Venezuela. Women from countries like Colombia are trafficked into Venezuela through prostitution trade networks originating in Colombia.  Children from Ecuador are trafficked into Venezuela to serve as prostitutes and work as street vendors and housemaids.  The victims are usually children who are kidnapped, sold by their parents, or deceived by false employment opportunities.  These children are first exploited through prostitution at the average age of 12.  Children as young as 7 years old have been found to be sexually exploited.  Of the 40,000 sexually exploited children in Venezuela, 78% are girls between the ages of 8 and 17.

The Department of Labor’s 2004 Findings on the Worst Forms of Child Labor

U.S. Dept of Labor Bureau of International Labor Affairs, 2005

www.dol.gov/ilab/media/reports/iclp/tda2004/ecuador.htm

[accessed 3 February 2011]

INCIDENCE AND NATURE OF CHILD LABOR - The commercial sexual exploitation of children occurs in Ecuador.  ILO-IPEC estimated that there were 5,200 girls and adolescents in situations of sexual exploitation in 2002, the most recent year for which statistics are available.  Ecuador is a country of origin, transit and destination for the trafficking of persons, but most child victims are trafficked internally for prostitution.

Human Rights Reports » 2005 Country Reports on Human Rights Practices

U.S. Dept of State Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor, March 8, 2006

www.state.gov/g/drl/rls/hrrpt/2005/61726.htm

[accessed 3 February 2011]

TRAFFICKING IN PERSONS – Anecdotal evidence showed that traffickers lured young victims romantically or with promises of dignified employment and then forced them into prostitution. Some poverty-stricken parents also sold their children, wittingly or unwittingly, into prostitution or forced labor in agriculture, including banana plantations, or mines.

Anecdotal evidence indicated that some of those willing to pay up to $12 thousand to be smuggled out of the country were also victims of trafficking, and women were susceptible to sexual abuse by smugglers.

Concluding Observations of the Committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC)

UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, 3 June 2005

www1.umn.edu/humanrts/crc/ecuador2005.html

[accessed 3 February 2011]

[69] The Committee takes note with appreciation of the considerable efforts undertaken by the State party, and the various studies conducted by different institutions regarding the issue of sexual exploitation and trafficking of children, as reported by the State party. The Committee expresses its deep concern at the high number of children involved in commercial sexual exploitation and at the insufficient measures adopted by the State party in this regard.

All material used herein reproduced under the fair use exception of 17 USC § 107 for noncommercial, nonprofit, and educational use.  PLEASE RESPECT COPYRIGHTS OF COMPONENT ARTICLES.  Cite this webpage as: Patt, Prof. Martin, "Human Trafficking & Modern-day Slavery - Ecuador", http://gvnet.com/humantrafficking/Ecuador.htm, [accessed <date>]

 

 

Torture in  [Ecuador]  [other countries]
Human Trafficking in  [Ecuador]  [other countries]
Street Children in  [Ecuador]  [other countries]
Child Prostitution in  [Ecuador]  [other countries]