Torture in  [Timor-Leste]  [other countries]
Human Trafficking in  [Timor-Leste]  [other countries]
Street Children in  [Timor-Leste]  [other countries]
Child Prostitution in  [Timor-Leste]  [other countries]
 

Human Trafficking & Modern-day Slavery

In the early years of the 21st Century                                              gvnet.com/humantrafficking/EastTimor.htm

Democratic Republic of Timor-Leste

By the end of 2005, refugees had returned or had settled in Indonesia. The country continues to face great challenges in rebuilding its infrastructure, strengthening the civil administration, and generating jobs for young people entering the work force.

The underlying economic policy challenge the country faces remains how best to use oil-and-gas wealth to lift the non-oil economy onto a higher growth path and to reduce poverty.  [The World Factbook, U.S.C.I.A. 2009]

Description: Description: EastTimor

Timor-Leste is a destination country for women from Indonesia, Thailand, the People’s Republic of China, Malaysia, and the Philippines trafficked for the purpose of commercial sexual exploitation, and a destination for men from Burma trafficked for the purpose of forced labor. Timor-Leste has a growing internal trafficking problem, mainly women and children lured to Dili from rural areas or camps for internally displaced persons with offers of employment and subsequently forced into prostitution. Transnational traffickers, who may be members of organized crime syndicates, typically recruit and control their victims through fraud and psychological coercion. - U.S. State Dept Trafficking in Persons Report, June, 2009  [full country report]

 

 

CAUTION:  The following links have been culled from the web to illuminate the situation in East Timor.  Some of these links may lead to websites that present allegations that are unsubstantiated or even false.  No attempt has been made to validate their authenticity or to verify their content.

*** FEATURED ARTICLE ***

Advancing the Campaign Against Child Labor: Efforts at the Country Level - Indonesia

U.S. Dept of Labor Bureau of International Labor Affairs, 2002

archive.today/D6kf2#selection-1077.1-1077.73

[accessed 11 September 2014]

[see footnote 992] 

Children have been reported in militia groups that formed in East Timor and in the separatist region of Aceh and in the Maluku Islands. Reports from the Malukus indicate that children between the ages of 7 and 12 years of age have participated in both sides of the conflict. “Asia Report: Indonesia and East Timor,” May 2000, 2, 7;

According to this source, sources within the churches in the region said at least 200 boys had been forcibly recruited and trained as fighters.

 

*** ARCHIVES ***

Timor-Leste: Tackling human trafficking

Integrated Regional Information Networks (IRIN), 4 February 2009

www.irinnews.org/report/82744/timor-leste-tackling-human-trafficking

[accessed 9 March 2015]

Since Timor-Leste gained independence in 2002, local Timorese women have been lured away from their homes and recruited with promises of work abroad.   Francisco Belo, a coordinator for the counter-trafficking project of the Alola Foundation, an NGO founded in 2001 to respond to the needs of women in Timor, told IRIN: "We have heard of almost 100 such cases… Especially near the border [with West Timor], traffickers have recruited women to work in Indonesia, Malaysia and other countries in southeast Asia. The families in Timor haven't heard from those women [again]."

TRAFFICKED PEOPLE IN TIMOR - Perhaps a bigger problem is the number of people being trafficked into the country. "Timor has become a destination for human traffickers. We have found people from Thailand, Indonesia, China and the Philippines - most of them working in the sex industry and most of them victims of human trafficking," he said.   Belo said the number of female commercial sex workers in Dili is now probably close to 550. Back in 2004, the prosecutor-general estimated there were 400 Chinese and 300 Vietnamese construction workers in Dili who were possible victims of trafficking.

East Timor: Old Migration Challenges in the World's Newest Country

Kimberly Hamilton, Migration Policy Institute, Migration Information Source, May 2004

www.migrationinformation.org/feature/display.cfm?ID=213

[accessed 2 February 2011]

BUILDING AN IMMIGRATION SYSTEM - The immigration function currently falls within the domain of the police. Because Timor-Leste shares a 142-mile (228km) long border with Indonesia, and has several Indonesian islands near its coastline, there are enormous security concerns. The border is porous and difficult to monitor. Current steep border crossing charges ($2 for native Timorese) encourage unauthorized crossings. Trafficking of women and girls from countries such as Thailand and Indonesia has also emerged as a problem in the country. Familiarizing the police force with the provisions of a new immigration law, tracking visas, and enforcing the law within a framework of human rights and due process remain important tasks as the country works to secure its border and to track and manage immigration.

Advancing the Campaign Against Child Labor: Efforts at the Country Level - Indonesia

U.S. Dept of Labor Bureau of International Labor Affairs, 2002

archive.today/D6kf2#selection-1077.1-1077.73

[accessed 11 September 2014]

[see footnote 992] 

Children have been reported in militia groups that formed in East Timor and in the separatist region of Aceh and in the Maluku Islands. Reports from the Malukus indicate that children between the ages of 7 and 12 years of age have participated in both sides of the conflict. “Asia Report: Indonesia and East Timor,” May 2000, 2, 7;

According to this source, sources within the churches in the region said at least 200 boys had been forcibly recruited and trained as fighters.

Seven Asian Nations Sign Pact to Limit Sex Trade

Marie Tessier, WEnews, January 8, 2002

www.womensenews.org/story/prostitution-and-trafficking/020108/seven-asian-nations-sign-pact-limit-sex-trade

[accessed 2 February 2011]

Human rights groups and UNICEF also have documented the special threats of sexual exploitation spawned by war and armed conflict. Desperation often compels women and children to offer sex in exchange for food, shelter, vital documents or safe passage through a war zone.

In East Timor, women were abducted, traded, raped and forced to do household chores.

BACK DOOR Newsletter on East Timor

BACK DOOR Newsletter on East Timor, June 2001

members.pcug.org.au/~wildwood/01junchild.htm

[accessed 2 February 2011]

New legislation being adopted for an independent East Timor will set 18 as the minimum age for recruitment. The reintegration of child soldiers, some as young as 12, who were used by both government and opposition forces during the conflict still presents a major challenge. The abduction and recruitment of children by anti-independence militia for the purposes of indoctrination has been reported. - COALITION TO STOP THE USE OF CHILD SOLDIERS

Human Rights Reports » 2005 Country Reports on Human Rights Practices

U.S. Dept of State Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor, March 8, 2006

www.state.gov/g/drl/rls/hrrpt/2005/61607.htm

[accessed 2 February 2011]

TRAFFICKING IN PERSONS – The law prohibits trafficking in women and children, whether for prostitution or for forced labor; however, there have been several reports of women and girls trafficked into the country for prostitution in recent years. In 2004 a local NGO conducted a baseline study of human trafficking and the sex industry and estimated that as many 115 foreign sex workers in the capital might be victims of trafficking. Several establishments in the capital were known commercial sex operations and were suspected of also being involved in trafficking.

UN officials and local NGO leaders cited several instances in which foreign women, usually of Chinese, Indonesian, or Thai origin, reported that they had been trafficked to the country and were being held against their will. For example, in 2004 two Indonesian women interviewed by a local NGO stated that they had been hired by a businessman in Jakarta to work as housekeepers in a Dili hotel. When they arrived in Dili, the man confiscated their passports and confined the women to his house, telling them that they had to work as prostitutes to pay back their travel expenses.

Freedom House Country Report - Political Rights: 3   Civil Liberties: 4   Status: Partly Free

2009 Edition

www.freedomhouse.org/report/freedom-world/2009/east-timor

[accessed 26 June 2012]

Human Rights Overview by Human Rights Watch – Defending Human Rights Worldwide

www.hrw.org/asia/east-timor

[accessed 2 February 2011]

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Cite this webpage as: Patt, Prof. Martin, "Human Trafficking & Modern-day Slavery - Timor-Leste (East Timor)", http://gvnet.com/humantrafficking/EastTimor.htm, [accessed <date>]

 

 

Torture in  [Timor-Leste]  [other countries]
Human Trafficking in  [Timor-Leste]  [other countries]
Street Children in  [Timor-Leste]  [other countries]
Child Prostitution in  [Timor-Leste]  [other countries]