Torture in  [ROC]  [other countries]
Human Trafficking in  [ROC]  [other countries]
Street Children in  [ROC]  [other countries]
Child Prostitution in  [ROC]  [other countries]
 

Human Trafficking & Modern-day Slavery

In the early years of the 21st Century                                            gvnet.com/humantrafficking/Congo-ROC.htm

Republic of the Congo (ROC)

The economy is a mixture of subsistence agriculture, an industrial sector based largely on oil, and support services, and a government characterized by budget problems and overstaffing. Oil has supplanted forestry as the mainstay of the economy, providing a major share of government revenues and exports.

The current administration presides over an uneasy internal peace and faces difficult economic challenges of stimulating recovery and reducing poverty.  [The World Factbook, U.S.C.I.A. 2009]

Description: Description: Congo-ROC

The Republic of the Congo (ROC) is a source country for children trafficked within its borders for the purposes of forced labor and commercial sexual exploitation, as well as a destination country for children trafficked from other African countries for the same purposes. Within the ROC, boys and girls are trafficked from rural areas, primarily from the Pool Region, to Point Noire and Brazzaville for forced street vending and domestic servitude. Girls are trafficked from rural areas primarily to Brazzaville, but also to Pointe Noire, for commercial sexual exploitation. Transnationally, children are trafficked from other African countries to Pointe Noire for domestic servitude, forced market vending and forced labor in the fishing industry.   - U.S. State Dept Trafficking in Persons Report, June, 2009   [full country report]

 

 

CAUTION:  The following links have been culled from the web to illuminate the situation in the Republic of the Congo (ROC).  Some of these links may lead to websites that present allegations that are unsubstantiated or even false.  No attempt has been made to verify their authenticity or to validate their content.

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Congo ‘pygmies’ suffer daily atrocities

Roch Eulonge N'zobo, Roger Bouka Owoko & Alain Oyandzi, “The Situation of the Pygmies in the Republic of Congo”, Congolese Observatory of Human Rights OCDH and the Rainforest Foundation, 2004

www.rainforestfoundationuk.org/files/NL%20Summer%202004%20-%20ebook.pdf

[accessed 17 July 2013]

[scroll down]

The Rainforest Foundation is urgently calling for justice, and recognition of the rights of the 'Pygmy' people, with the release of a report exposing alarming human rights violations suffered by 'Pygmies' in the Republic of Congo.

Beatings, rape, 'slavery' and discrimination were documented in the report based on investigations by our partners, the Congolese Observatory of Human Rights (OCDH). The report, published by the Rainforest Foundation, reveals cases of collective rapes, police brutality, and appalling health, housing and education systems. Very few 'Pygmies' have basic civil rights and most lack national identity cards.

 

*** ARCHIVES ***

Congo ‘pygmies’ suffer daily atrocities

Roch Eulonge N'zobo, Roger Bouka Owoko & Alain Oyandzi, “The Situation of the Pygmies in the Republic of Congo”, Congolese Observatory of Human Rights OCDH and the Rainforest Foundation, 2004

www.rainforestfoundationuk.org/files/NL%20Summer%202004%20-%20ebook.pdf

[accessed 17 July 2013]

[scroll down]

The Rainforest Foundation is urgently calling for justice, and recognition of the rights of the 'Pygmy' people, with the release of a report exposing alarming human rights violations suffered by 'Pygmies' in the Republic of Congo.

Beatings, rape, 'slavery' and discrimination were documented in the report based on investigations by our partners, the Congolese Observatory of Human Rights (OCDH). The report, published by the Rainforest Foundation, reveals cases of collective rapes, police brutality, and appalling health, housing and education systems. Very few 'Pygmies' have basic civil rights and most lack national identity cards.

The Situation of the Pygmies in the Republic of Congo [PDF]

OCDH - Observatoire Congolais des Droits de l'Homme, July 2004

www.rainforestfoundationuk.org/files/OCDH%20Rpt%201%20%28English%29%20v.2.pdf

[accessed 30 January 2011]

[pages 19 & 20]  4.4. WORKING CONDITIONS THAT RESEMBLE MODERN SLAVERY – The work the Pygmies carry out for the Bantu in Ngoua II resembles forced labour. They put a great deal of effort into what is hard and often badly paid work. A day's work on a Bantu farm pays between 500 and 1,000 F.CFA, (50p to £1), according to the employer's whim. No consideration is made of the effort made.

On 30 June 2003, OCDH members traveled with a Pygmy, Mr. Ingouma, who had been requisitioned by a Bantu to carry a sack of groundnuts weighing over 80 kgs a distance of more than 50 kms from Ngoua II. In return, the Bantu gave him a bottle of palm wine valued at 250 F.CFA (25p).

Like the Bantu, the Pygmies who work at Man Fai Tai, the main logging company in the area, confirm that they are treated 'like slaves' by the Malaysians who run the company

The Pygmies of Kabo regularly incur debts with the Bantu. And, by lending them money, these Bantu are creating the conditions that force the Pygmies into coming back for another loan. The practice thus becomes entrenched and is, in fact, a form of 'debtslavery' for the salaried Pygmies. At the end of the month, unable to read or write, they have to pay off amounts established according to the word of their Bantu creditors. When they cannot pay all their debts, these creditors take them to courts that issue orders to stop and seize the debtor Pygmies' salaries.

Republic of Congo has nearly 2,000 children victims of human trafficking

Xinhua News Agency, June 21, 2007

english.people.com.cn/200706/21/eng20070621_386239.html

[accessed 30 January 2011]

"We can affirm today that human trafficking targeting children exists indeed in Congo. Our country has become a destination for children coming mainly from West Africa and Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). The children brought to Congo are aged from nine years on average and few of them, if any, are taken to school," Raoul said Tuesday, adding her country "will do whatever possible to curb this degrading phenomenon." Once they arrive in the country of destination, the children are exploited in production factories, selling merchandise in the streets or in prostitution.

The Protection Project - Republic of the Congo (ROC) [DOC]

The Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS), The Johns Hopkins University

www.protectionproject.org/human_rights_reports/report_documents/congor.doc

[Last accessed 2009]

FACTORS THAT CONTRIBUTE TO THE TRAFFICKING INFRASTRUCTURE - Poverty, a lack of education, a lack of opportunity, gender inequality, and civil unrest are some of the major factors that contribute to the trafficking infrastructure in the Republic of the Congo. Criminal activity, especially among the Angolan, Congolese, and Nigerian crime networks, is believed to be linked to trafficking as well.

FORMS OF TRAFFICKING - Evidence suggests that hundreds of children from the Republic of the Congo, from the neighboring Democratic Republic of the Congo, and from some West African states are used as domestic servants and street sellers in the Republic of the Congo.

Freedom House Country Report - Political Rights: 6   Civil Liberties: 5   Status: Not Free

2009 Edition

www.freedomhouse.org/report/freedom-world/2009/congo-republic-brazzaville

[accessed 26 June 2012]

The Department of Labor’s 2006 Findings on the Worst Forms of Child Labor [PDF]

U.S. Dept of Labor Bureau of International Labor Affairs, 2007

www.dol.gov/ilab/programs/ocft/PDF/2006OCFTreport.pdf

[accessed 2 November 2010]

INCIDENCE AND NATURE OF CHILD LABOR - Children work with their families on farms or in informal business activities. In Brazzaville and other urban centers, there are significant numbers of street children, primarily from the neighboring Democratic Republic of the Congo, who engage in street vending and begging. There were isolated cases of children involved in commercial sexual exploitation. There are unconfirmed accounts of trafficking into the Republic of Congo of “minor relatives” of immigrants from West Africa. Children from West Africa reportedly work as domestic servants, fishermen, shop workers, and street sellers.

Human Rights Reports » 2006 Country Reports on Human Rights Practices

U.S. Dept of State Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor, March 6, 2007

www.state.gov/g/drl/rls/hrrpt/2006/78729.htm

[accessed 30 January 2011]

TRAFFICKING IN PERSONS – The law does not specifically prohibit trafficking in persons, and there were unconfirmed reports of trafficking of children by West African immigrants living in the country. Trafficking could be prosecuted under existing laws against slavery, prostitution, rape, illegal immigration, forced labor, and regulations regarding employer employee relations; however, there were no known cases of the government prosecuting any trafficker under these laws. The ministries of security, labor, and social affairs, as well as the gendarmerie, have responsibility for trafficking issues.

There were unconfirmed reports that the country was a country of destination for trafficked persons. It was not known to be a country of transit or origin. There were unconfirmed reports that minor relatives of immigrants from West Africa could be victims of trafficking. There was no evidence of trafficking in adults. Children from West Africa worked as fishermen, shop workers, street sellers, or domestic servants. There were reports that some were physically abused.

Concluding Observations of the Committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC)

UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, 29 September 2006

www1.umn.edu/humanrts/crc/congo2006.html

[accessed 30 January 2011]

[79] While noting with appreciation the ratification by the State party of relevant ILO Conventions, as well as the adoption of an appropriate legislative framework, the Committee is concerned at the lack of data on the issue of economic exploitation of children. The Committee is also concerned at information according to which children, in particular indigenous children, are exploited economically. Finally, the Committee is concerned at reports that children, in particular from the Democratic Republic of Congo and indigenous children, are recruited to clean sewers and latrines manually, which is extremely hazardous to their health.

[81] While welcoming the study on the sexual exploitation of children which is being conducted with UNICEF’s support, the Committee expresses concern at sexual harassment in schools. It is also concerned at the fact that sexual exploitation of children is a widespread practice. The Committee is also concerned at the fact that the Portella Law prohibiting the presence of children in bars and night clubs is not enforced.

[83] While noting that the State party has ratified the Convention for the Suppression of the Traffic in Persons and of the Exploitation of the Prostitution of Others on 25 August 1977, the Committee is concerned at the absence of legislation prohibiting trafficking in persons, particularly children.

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Torture in  [ROC]  [other countries]
Human Trafficking in  [ROC]  [other countries]
Street Children in  [ROC]  [other countries]
Child Prostitution in  [ROC]  [other countries]