Torture in  [The Central African Republic]  [other countries]
Human Trafficking in  [The Central African Republic]  [other countries]
Street Children in  [The Central African Republic]  [other countries]
Child Prostitution in  [The Central African Republic]  [other countries]
 

Human Trafficking & Modern-day Slavery

In the early years of the 21st Century                                  gvnet.com/humantrafficking/CentralAfricanRep.htm

The Central African Republic

Subsistence agriculture, together with forestry, remains the backbone of the economy of the Central African Republic (CAR), with more than 70% of the population living in outlying areas. The agricultural sector generates more than half of GDP.

Distribution of income is extraordinarily unequal. Grants from France and the international community can only partially meet humanitarian needs.  [The World Factbook, U.S.C.I.A. 2009]

Description: Description: Description: CentralAfricanRep

The Central African Republic (CAR) is a source, transit, and destination country for men, women, and children trafficked for the purposes of forced labor and sexual exploitation. The majority of victims are children trafficked within the country for sexual exploitation, domestic servitude, forced ambulant vending, and forced agricultural, mine, market, and restaurant labor.

In addition, rebels conscript children into armed forces in the northwestern and northeastern regions of the country. Unable to survive as hunters and gatherers because of depleted forests, Pygmies are subjected to forced agricultural labor by Central African villagers. - U.S. State Dept Trafficking in Persons Report, June, 2009 [full country report]

 

CAUTION:  The following links have been culled from the web to illuminate the situation in the Central African Republic.  Some of these links may lead to websites that present allegations that are unsubstantiated or even false.  No attempt has been made to validate their authenticity or to verify their content.

*** FEATURED ARTICLE ***

Crime & Society -  Comparative Criminology tour of the World - Central African Republic

Dr. Robert Winslow, San Diego State University, A Comparative Criminology Tour of the World

www-rohan.sdsu.edu/faculty/rwinslow/africa/central_african_republic.html

[accessed 28 January 2011]

TRAFFICKING IN PERSONS- The indigenous Ba'Aka often are coerced into agricultural, domestic, and other types of labor within the country. The Ba'Aka often are considered to be the slaves of other local ethnic groups, and subjected to wages far below those prescribed by the labor code. Additionally there have been credible reports of three cases in which persons obtained a Ba'Aka child by deception and subsequently sent the child to Europe for adoption. One of the cases reportedly involved the implicit cooperation of government authorities.

 

*** ARCHIVES ***

The Department of Labor’s 2004 Findings on the Worst Forms of Child Labor

U.S. Dept of Labor Bureau of International Labor Affairs, 2005

www.dol.gov/ilab/media/reports/iclp/tda2004/central-african-republic.htm

[accessed 28 January 2011]

INCIDENCE AND NATURE OF CHILD LABOR - Children are trafficked to the Central African Republic generally from Nigeria, Sudan and Chad for work in domestic service, small shops, and agriculture.  Traveling merchants, herders, and other foreigners working in and transiting the country sometimes brought boys and girls with them.  Such children did not attend school and were not paid for their work.  There are some reports that children are trafficked from the country to Nigeria and other nearby nations for work in agriculture.

Human Rights Reports » 2005 Country Reports on Human Rights Practices

U.S. Dept of State Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor, March 8, 2006

www.state.gov/g/drl/rls/hrrpt/2005/61560.htm

[accessed 28 January 2011]

TRAFFICKING IN PERSONS – There was strong agreement among NGOs and government officials that trafficking in persons was not widespread.  Trafficking was confined primarily to children, both girls and boys, who were primarily orphans. During the year there were reports that these children were forced into domestic servitude and commercial labor activities, such as street vending and agricultural work. In recent years, there were reports that children were brought in by members of the foreign Muslim community from Nigeria, Sudan, and Chad and that merchants, herders, and other foreigners doing business in and transiting the country brought girls and boys into the country. It was not clear whether children who were victims of trafficking were related to their caretakers. Child trafficking victims were not afforded the benefit of a formal education, despite the mandatory school age, and worked without remuneration for their labor. There were a few anecdotal reports of children being trafficked to Nigeria and several other nearby countries for use as agricultural workers.

Concluding Observations of the Committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC)

UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, 6 October 2000

www1.umn.edu/humanrts/crc/centralafrica2000.html

[accessed 28 January 2011]

[50] The Committee joins the State party in expressing deep concern at the problems suffered by children in the context of domestic adoption, inter-country adoption and guardianship proceedings, and in particular at reports of the ill-treatment of children by guardians

[84] The Committee is concerned that children may be at risk of being sold or made to engage in prostitution.

The Protection Project - Central African Republic [DOC]

The Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS), The Johns Hopkins University

www.protectionproject.org/human_rights_reports/report_documents/car.doc

[Last accessed 2009]

FACTORS THAT CONTRIBUTE TO THE TRAFFICKING INFRASTRUCTURE - Deterioration of living conditions in rural areas and the search for unskilled and docile workers are blamed for trafficking in children from the Central African Republic to Cameroon. Poverty, coupled with large family size, is also a main contributing factor. Other factors include strong demand for labor in the informal sector, low awareness of trafficking among the local population, open borders, and corrupt officials.

Crime & Society -  Comparative Criminology tour of the World - Central African Republic

Dr. Robert Winslow, San Diego State University, A Comparative Criminology Tour of the World

www-rohan.sdsu.edu/faculty/rwinslow/africa/central_african_republic.html

[accessed 28 January 2011]

TRAFFICKING IN PERSONS- The indigenous Ba'Aka often are coerced into agricultural, domestic, and other types of labor within the country. The Ba'Aka often are considered to be the slaves of other local ethnic groups, and subjected to wages far below those prescribed by the labor code. Additionally there have been credible reports of three cases in which persons obtained a Ba'Aka child by deception and subsequently sent the child to Europe for adoption. One of the cases reportedly involved the implicit cooperation of government authorities.

ILO study finds forced labour and human trafficking on the rise

International Labour Organisation ILO News, Geneva, 25 May 2001

www.ilo.org/global/about-the-ilo/press-and-media-centre/news/WCMS_007842/lang--en/index.htm

[accessed 28 August 2012]

While there is universal consensus on the definition of forced labor (essentially work performed under compulsion and subject to a penalty), some of the forms it takes are still sources of policy debate. Among the most contentious issues are those involving compulsory participation of citizens in public works in the context of economic development, a practice which prevails in a number of Asian countries (including Vietnam) and African countries (Central African Republic, Sierra Leone and Tanzania).

U.S. Government Urges Nigeria to Increase Prosecutions and Convictions of Traffickers in Persons

U.S. Department of State, U.S. Diplomatic Mission to Nigeria Press Release, June 6, 2006

At one time this article had been archived and may possibly still be accessible [here]

[accessed 31 August 2011]

Victims are trafficked for domestic servitude, street hawking, agricultural labor, and sexual exploitation.  Internationally, they are trafficked to the Central African Republic, Mali, Gabon, Sudan, North Africa, Saudi Arabia, Italy, Spain, the Netherlands, Belgium, Germany, and Austria.  Women and children are also trafficked to Nigeria from Togo, Benin, Chad, Cameroon, the Central African Republic, Niger, and Ghana," the report also said.

Freedom House Country Report - Political Rights: 5   Civil Liberties: 5   Status: Partly Free

2009 Edition

www.freedomhouse.org/report/freedom-world/2009/central-african-republic

[accessed 26 June 2012]

Human Rights Overview by Human Rights Watch – Defending Human Rights Worldwide

www.hrw.org/africa/central-african-republic

[accessed 28 January 2011]

Promotion and Protection of the Rights of Children - Sale of children, child prostitution and child pornography - Note by the Secretary-General

Ms. Ofelia Calcetas-Santos, Special Rapporteur on the sale of children, child prostitution and child pornography, UN General Assembly, Fifty-second session, Agenda item 108, 16 October 1997

www.unhchr.ch/huridocda/huridoca.nsf/0/cb9d9d07045a9d5380256679003c4e9c?OpenDocument

[accessed 28 January 2011]

19. In the Central African Republic, the Special Rapporteur has received disconcerting information about the practice of families marrying their daughters as young as 11 or 12, for financial gain, to older husbands. The prevalence of such traditional practices, including the trokosi practice in Ghana, already mentioned in previous reports, is a matter of concern.

All material used herein reproduced under the fair use exception of 17 USC § 107 for noncommercial, nonprofit, and educational use.  PLEASE RESPECT COPYRIGHTS OF COMPONENT ARTICLES.

Cite this webpage as: Patt, Prof. Martin, "Human Trafficking & Modern-day Slavery – Central African Republic", http://gvnet.com/humantrafficking/CentralAfricanRep.htm, [accessed <date>]

 

 

Torture in  [The Central African Republic]  [other countries]
Human Trafficking in  [The Central African Republic]  [other countries]
Street Children in  [The Central African Republic]  [other countries]
Child Prostitution in  [The Central African Republic]  [other countries]