Torture in  [Saudi Arabia]  [other countries]
Human Trafficking in  [Saudi Arabia]  [other countries]
Street Children in  [Saudi Arabia]  [other countries]
Child Prostitution in  [Saudi Arabia]  [other countries]
 

Child Prostitution

The Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children

In the early years of the 21st Century                                                      gvnet.com/childprostitution/SaudiArabia.htm

Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

Saudi Arabia has an oil-based economy with strong government controls over major economic activities.

About 40% of GDP comes from the private sector. Roughly 6.4 million foreign workers play an important role in the Saudi economy, particularly in the oil and service sectors.

The government is encouraging private sector growth - especially in power generation, telecommunications, natural gas exploration, and petrochemicals - to lessen the kingdom's dependence on oil exports and to increase employment opportunities for the swelling Saudi population, nearly 40% of which are youths under 15 years old. Unemployment is high, and the large youth population generally lacks the education and technical skills the private sector needs. Riyadh has substantially boosted spending on job training and education, infrastructure development, and government salaries.  [The World Factbook, U.S.C.I.A. 2009]

SaudiArabia

CAUTION:  The following links and accompanying text have been culled from the web to illuminate the situation in Saudi Arabia.  Some of these links may lead to websites that present allegations that are unsubstantiated, misleading or even false.   No attempt has been made to validate their authenticity or to verify their content.

*** FEATURED ARTICLE ***

US Child Sex Slaves In Saudi Arabia

Herb Mallard, Co-Chairman, Americans Against The Sauduction Of Washington, Issue #17

At one time this article had been archived and may possibly still be accessible [here]

[accessed 18 September 2011]

[scroll down]

US CHILD SEX SLAVES IN SAUDI ARABIA - We are continuing a limited investigation of the nonparental abductions of US children by Saudi princes. We have interviewed past Saud family palace domestic slaves who have been assigned to care for child sex slaves primarily kidnapped from the US and Northern Europe. It seems procedurally after being routinely processed by the Saudi Arabian Government upon entry the children are immediately brought to the respective palace where they are indoctrinated through a brainwashing practice. The suborning technique through a system of rewards and punishments includes US child sex slaves being given a Saudi name while their US name and religious beliefs are expunged from their mind. If the children use their US name or religious beliefs at any time thereafter, they are severely reprimanded with further conditioning. In tandem, the US State Department policy is that it refuses to investigate US child sex slaves within Middle East unless they are given the US name of the child. htcp

 

*** ARCHIVES ***

Human Rights Reports » 2005 Country Reports on Human Rights Practices

U.S. Dept of State Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor, March 8, 2006

www.state.gov/g/drl/rls/hrrpt/2005/61698.htm

[accessed 21 December 2010]

WOMEN - Prostitution is illegal. Some women, primarily non-citizens, engaged in prostitution. The extent of prostitution was not known.

CHILDREN - The figures excluded female children and accusations of sexual abuse, as the ministry stated that the issues were too sensitive for public discussion.

Concluding Observations of the Committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC)

UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, 26 January 2001

www1.umn.edu/humanrts/crc/saudiarabia2001.html

[accessed 21 December 2010]

[43] The Committee encourages the State party to ratify and implement the Optional Protocols to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the sale of children, child prostitution and child pornography, and on the involvement of children in armed conflict.

Saudi Non-Profit Organization to Tackle Child Trafficking in the Middle East

Ali Mateer, Asharq Al-Awsat, Jeddah, Jun 3, 2006

www.asharq-e.com/news.asp?section=1&id=5177

[accessed 17 July 2011]

Jeddah, Asharq Al-Awsat - A Saudi charity, in collaboration with UNICEF, plans to carry out a groundbreaking study on the exploitation and trafficking of children.

Five Years After Stockholm [PDF]

ECPAT: Fifth Report on implementation of the Agenda for Action

ECPAT International, November 2001

www.no-trafficking.org/content/web/05reading_rooms/five_years_after_stockholm.pdf

[accessed 13 September 2011]

6.1 MIDDLE EAST [A] THE IMPACT OF THE STOCKHOLM AGENDA FOR ACTION ON WORK AGAINST THE COMMERCIAL SEXUAL EXPLOITATION OF CHILDREN – Some NGOs and government sources from Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Yemen and Kuwait confirm that they are not familiar with the Stockholm Agenda for Action. However, the ILO in Saudi Arabia, the government of Qatar as well as the NGO Women’s Forum for Research and Training in Yemen and the Human Rights Division in Kuwait, have all shown a genuine interest in the Agenda and are studying research and surveys on commercial sexual exploitation of children with the aim of addressing the issue.

5.1 Middle East - State of CSEC/ Attitudes toward CSEC [PDF]

ECPAT International, November 2000 -- Looking Back Thinking Forward  - The fourth report on the implementation of the Agenda for Action adopted at the World Congress against Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children held in Stockholm, Sweden, August 1996

At one time this article had been archived and may possibly still be accessible [here]

[accessed 17 July 2011]

In the wealthy oil producing states, (e.g. Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Oman etc), foreigners are often the unfortunate victims of commercial sexual exploitation. The financial ability to contribute to CSEC, the lack of legal protection measures for foreign children, and the low status of foreigners in society, contributes to CSEC. Additionally, the high numbers of male foreign workers in these countries create a large demand for prostitution.

Commercial sexual exploitation of children: The situation in the Middle East/North Africa region

This summary is based on the situation analysis written by Dr Najat M’jid for the Arab-African Forum against Commercial Sexual Exploitation, Rabat, Morocco, 24-26 October 2001

www.unicef.org/events/yokohama/backgound8.html

[accessed 17 July 2011]

These countries also have in common, however, a number of constraints that have hindered preparation of national plans of action. In all the countries of the region, there is cultural resistance to addressing the problem because the subject is largely taboo.  Often the issue is dealt with more generally under headings such as ‘violence’ and ‘trauma’.  This means that there has been no regional consensus on defining CSEC in law; in some countries, for example, it is looked upon as an indecent act, in others as rape, although in all 20 countries there is some section of the penal code that can be invoked against sexual abuse and exploitation.

US Child Sex Slaves In Saudi Arabia

Herb Mallard, Co-Chairman, Americans Against The Sauduction Of Washington, Issue #17

At one time this article had been archived and may possibly still be accessible [here]

[accessed 18 September 2011]

[scroll down]

US CHILD SEX SLAVES IN SAUDI ARABIA - We are continuing a limited investigation of the nonparental abductions of US children by Saudi princes. We have interviewed past Saud family palace domestic slaves who have been assigned to care for child sex slaves primarily kidnapped from the US and Northern Europe. It seems procedurally after being routinely processed by the Saudi Arabian Government upon entry the children are immediately brought to the respective palace where they are indoctrinated through a brainwashing practice. The suborning technique through a system of rewards and punishments includes US child sex slaves being given a Saudi name while their US name and religious beliefs are expunged from their mind. If the children use their US name or religious beliefs at any time thereafter, they are severely reprimanded with further conditioning. In tandem, the US State Department policy is that it refuses to investigate US child sex slaves within Middle East unless they are given the US name of the child. htcp

All material used herein reproduced under the fair use exception of 17 USC § 107 for noncommercial, nonprofit, and educational use.  PLEASE RESPECT COPYRIGHTS OF COMPONENT ARTICLES.  Cite this webpage as: Patt, Prof. Martin, "Child Prostitution – Saudi Arabia", http://gvnet.com/childprostitution/SaudiArabia.htm, [accessed <date>]

 

 

Torture in  [Saudi Arabia]  [other countries]
Human Trafficking in  [Saudi Arabia]  [other countries]
Street Children in  [Saudi Arabia]  [other countries]
Child Prostitution in  [Saudi Arabia]  [other countries]