Torture in  [Ireland]  [other countries]
Human Trafficking in  [Ireland]  [other countries]
Street Children in  [Ireland]  [other countries]
Child Prostitution in  [Ireland]  [other countries]
 

Torture by Police, Forced Disappearance

& Other Ill Treatment

In the early years of the 21st Century                                                                  gvnet.com/torture/Ireland.htm

Republic of Ireland

Ireland is a small, modern, trade-dependent economy. GDP growth averaged 6% in 1995-2007, but economic activity dropped sharply in 2008 and Ireland entered into a recession for the first time in more than a decade with the onset of the world financial crisis and subsequent severe slowdown in the property and construction markets. Agriculture, once the most important sector, is now dwarfed by industry and services.

Per capita GDP also surged during Ireland's high-growth years, and in 2007 surpassed that of the United States. The Irish Government has implemented a series of national economic programs designed to curb price and wage inflation, invest in infrastructure, increase labor force skills, and promote foreign investment.  [The World Factbook, U.S.C.I.A. 2009]

Description: Description: Description: Ireland

CAUTION:  The following links have been culled from the web to illuminate the situation in Ireland.  Some of these links may lead to websites that present allegations that are unsubstantiated or even false.  No attempt has been made to validate their authenticity or to verify their content.

*** ARCHIVES ***

Conclusions and recommendations of the Committee against Torture

U.N. Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment  -- Doc. CAT/C/IRL/CO/1 (2011)

www1.umn.edu/humanrts/cat/observations/ireland2011.html

[accessed 15 Aug  2013]

Complaint and investigation mechanisms

18. The Committee notes the information provided by the State party with regard to the investigation of complaints by prisoners against prison staff relating to incidents which allegedly occurred in the following prisons: Portlaoise, on 30 June 2009; Mountjoy, on 15 June 2009 and 12 January 2010; Cork, on 16 December 2009; and Midlands, on 7 June 2009. The Committee notes with concern that in all these cases there have been no independent and effective investigations into the allegations of ill-treatment by prison staff. The Inspector of Prisons, in his report of 10 September 2010 entitled “Guidance on best practice for dealing with prisoners’ complaints”, concluded that there is no independent complaints and investigation body to investigate prisoners’ complaints and that present procedures followed do not accord with best practice, and recommended the establishment of an independent mechanism to receive and investigate complaints against prison staff (arts. 2, 12, 13 and 16).

The Committee recommends that the State party:

(a) Establish an independent and effective complaint and investigation mechanism to facilitate the submission of complaints by victims of torture and ill- treatment by prison staff and ensure that in practice complainants are protected against any intimidation or reprisals as a consequence of the complaints;

(b) Institute prompt, impartial and thorough investigations into all allegations of torture or ill-treatment by prison staff;

(c) Ensure that all officials who are allegedly involved in any violation of the Convention are suspended from their duties during the conduct of the investigations;

(d) Provide the Committee with information on the number of complaints made concerning allegations of torture and ill-treatment by prison staff, the number of investigations carried out and the number of prosecutions and convictions, as well as on the redress awarded to victims.

19. The Committee welcomes the establishment of the Garda Si ocha na Ombudsman Commission (GSOC) in 2005, the members of which cannot be serving members or former members of the Garda Si ocha na (Police Force). GSOC is empowered to investigate complaints of torture and ill-treatment against members of the Garda Si ocha na. However, the Committee regrets that GSOC can also refer complaints to the Garda (Police) Commissioner, who can proceed with the investigations independently or under the supervision of GSOC, except complaints concerning the death of or serious harm to a person in police custody. The Committee is also concerned at the information that GSOC has submitted proposals for the amendment of the Garda Si ocha na Act of 2005 in a number of areas, including the power to allow GSOC to refer investigations back to the Garda Si ocha na, thereby allowing the police to investigate itself (arts. 2, 12, 13 and 16).

The Committee recommends that the State party ensure by law that all allegations of torture and ill-treatment by the police are directly investigated by the Garda Si ocha na Ombudsman Commission and that sufficient funds are allocated to the Commission so as to enable it to carry out its duties promptly and impartially and to deal with the backlog of complaints and investigations which has accumulated. The Committee also requests the State party to provide it with statistical data on (a) the number of complaints of torture and ill-treatment filed against prison officers, the number of investigations instituted, and the number of prosecutions and convictions imposed; and (b) the number of cases that have been referred to the Garda Si ocha na.

Human Rights Reports » 2005 Country Reports on Human Rights Practices

U.S. Dept of State Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor, March 8, 2006

www.state.gov/g/drl/rls/hrrpt/2005/61654.htm

[accessed 31 January 2013]

TORTURE AND OTHER CRUEL, INHUMAN, OR DEGRADING TREATMENT OR PUNISHMENT – Although the law prohibits such practices, there were reports of abuse by police officers.

In 2004 the Police Complaints Board recorded 1,232 complaints, including abuse of authority, discourtesy, neglect, and discreditable conduct of police officers, compared with 1,175 such complaints recorded in 2003. Of these complaints, 31 cases were adjudicated as minor breaches of discipline and referred to the commissioner, and 27 were deemed breaches of discipline and referred to a tribunal.

Freedom House Country Report - Political Rights: 1   Civil Liberties: 1   Status: Free

2009 Edition

www.freedomhouse.org/report/freedom-world/2009/ireland

[accessed 31 January 2013]

The legal system is based on common law, and the judiciary is independent. Council of Europe inspectors in 2006 found evidence of some beatings and other ill-treatment of detainees by police, mostly at the time of arrest, but stated that prisons are generally well run.

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Cite this webpage as: Patt, Prof. Martin, " Torture by Police, Forced Disappearance & Other Ill Treatment in the early years of the 21st Century- Ireland", http://gvnet.com/torture/Ireland.htm, [accessed <date>]

 

 

Torture in  [Ireland]  [other countries]
Human Trafficking in  [Ireland]  [other countries]
Street Children in  [Ireland]  [other countries]
Child Prostitution in  [Ireland]  [other countries]