Torture in  [Estonia]  [other countries]
Human Trafficking in  [Estonia]  [other countries]
Street Children in  [Estonia]  [other countries]
Child Prostitution in  [Estonia]  [other countries]
 

Torture by Police, Forced Disappearance

& Other Ill Treatment

In the early years of the 21st Century                                                                gvnet.com/torture/Estonia.htm

Republic of Estonia

Estonia, a 2004 European Union entrant, has a modern market-based economy and one of the highest per capita income levels in Central Europe.

Estonia's economy slowed down markedly and even fell into recession in mid-2008, primarily as a result of an investment and consumption slump following the bursting of the real estate market bubble.  [The World Factbook, U.S.C.I.A. 2009]

Description: Description: Estonia

CAUTION:  The following links have been culled from the web to illuminate the situation in Estonia.  Some of these links may lead to websites that present allegations that are unsubstantiated or even false.  No attempt has been made to validate their authenticity or to verify their content.

*** ARCHIVES ***

Anti-torture unit reports on Estonia

Council of Europe, Human Rights Europe

www.humanrightseurope.org/2014/01/anti-torture-unit-reports-on-estonia/

[accessed 21 Jan 2014]

The report reveals that “the CPT’s delegation received almost no allegations of physical ill-treatment of persons detained by the police; practically all the detained persons interviewed by the delegation who were or had recently been in police custody said that they had been treated correctly.

“However, the delegation did receive a few isolated allegations of excessive use of force (such as kicks, punches, tight handcuffing) by police officers at the time of apprehension, after the person concerned had been brought under control.”

Conclusions and recommendations of the Committee against Torture

U.N. Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment  -- Doc. CAT/C/EST/CO/4 (2008)

www1.umn.edu/humanrts/cat/observations/estonia2008.html

[accessed 27 February 2013]

Fundamental legal safeguards of detained persons

9. The Committee is concerned about the practical implementation of the fundamental legal safeguards of detained persons, including access to an independent medical doctor, as well as about the registration of all detained persons (art. 2).

The State party should ensure that all detained suspects are afforded, in practice, fundamental legal safeguards during their detention, including the right to access a lawyer, an independent medical examination, inform a relative and to be informed of their rights at the moment they are deprived of their liberty, including about the charges brought against them, as well as to be promptly presented to a judge.

Administrative detention

10. The Committee is concerned about the possibility of “administrative detention in jail” and “administrative arrest” (paras. 89 and 215 of the State party report) and about the complete absence of information on such detention in the report as well as from the delegation, especially regarding the competent authority and the applicable legal safeguards (art. 2).

The State party should provide the Committee with detailed information on such “administrative detention” and insure that the fundamental legal safeguards also apply in such cases.

Appropriate penalties for acts of torture in the Penal Code

13. The Committee remains concerned about the inadequacy of the penalties applicable to torture, i.e. of articles 122, 291, 312 and 324 of the Penal Code, ranging from “pecuniary punishment” to a maximum of five years imprisonment (art. 4).

The State party should ensure that torture is punishable by appropriate penalties which take into account its grave nature, as set out in paragraph 2 of article 4 of the

Convention.

Complaints, investigations and appropriate sentencing

15. The Committee notes the supervision activities of prisons by the Ministry of Justice, of arrest houses by the Police Board, of psychiatric institutions by the Health Board and of the Illuka Reception Centre for Asylum-Seekers by the Ministry of Social Affairs and the Defence Forces.  The Committee is nevertheless concerned about the inadequate complaint mechanism existing for all places where persons are deprived of liberty and about insufficient oversight and monitoring of such places, as well as the small numbers of perpetrators of acts of torture or cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment convicted with appropriate sentences for the grave nature of the acts committed (arts. 12 and 13).

The State party should ensure that complaint mechanisms exist in all places where persons are deprived of liberty and that the oversight and monitoring of such places is adequate.

The State party should promptly, thoroughly and impartially investigate all allegations of acts of torture or other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment, bring the responsible to justice and punish those convicted with sentences proportional to the gravity of their offence.

Human Rights Reports » 2005 Country Reports on Human Rights Practices

U.S. Dept of State Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor, March 8, 2006

www.state.gov/g/drl/rls/hrrpt/2005/61646.htm

[accessed 25 January 2013]

TORTURE AND OTHER CRUEL, INHUMAN, OR DEGRADING TREATMENT OR PUNISHMENT – The law prohibits such practices; however, there were reports that police used excessive physical force and verbal abuse during the arrest and questioning of suspects. In September a retired individual accused local police officers of using excessive force on him. The police initiated an official investigation, which determined that the police officers had acted according to the rules.

In 2003 the court brought charges against two police officers for use of excessive force. In the spring the Jarva rural court found the police officers guilty and sentenced them to two years' probation. In June the Tallinn district court reversed the Jarva rural court's decision.

In June the Tallinn district court sentenced three former police officers to probation with terms ranging from six months to three and a half years for the use of excessive force on several occasions in 2001.

There were 15 pending investigations related to the use of excessive force by police officers at year's end.

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Cite this webpage as: Patt, Prof. Martin, "Torture by Police, Forced Disappearance & Other Ill Treatment in the early years of the 21st Century- Estonia", http://gvnet.com/torture/Estonia.htm, [accessed <date>]

 

 

Torture in  [Estonia]  [other countries]
Human Trafficking in  [Estonia]  [other countries]
Street Children in  [Estonia]  [other countries]
Child Prostitution in  [Estonia]  [other countries]