Torture in  [Switzerland]  [other countries]
Human Trafficking in  [Switzerland]  [other countries]
Street Children in  [Switzerland]  [other countries]
Child Prostitution in  [Switzerland]  [other countries]
 

Human Trafficking & Modern-day Slavery

In the early years of the 21st Century                                              gvnet.com/humantrafficking/Switzerland.htm

Swiss Confederation (Switzerland)

Switzerland is a peaceful, prosperous, and stable modern market economy with low unemployment, a highly skilled labor force, and a per capita GDP among the highest in the world. Switzerland's economy benefits from a highly developed service sector led by financial services and a manufacturing industry that specializes in high-technology, knowledge-based production.  [The World Factbook, U.S.C.I.A. 2009]

Description: Description: Switzerland

Switzerland is primarily a destination and, to a lesser extent, a transit country for women and children trafficked for the purposes of commercial sexual exploitation and forced labor. One NGO reported that roughly 50 percent of the trafficking victims counseled in Switzerland came from Eastern Europe; 27 percent were from Latin America; 14 percent were from Asia; and the remaining nine percent came from Africa.

There is reportedly forced labor in the domestic service sector. Trafficking of ethnic Roma minors, who reportedly are brought from other European countries to various Swiss cities to beg and commit petty theft, is a rising concern of Swiss authorities.   - U.S. State Dept Trafficking in Persons Report, June, 2009  [full country report]

 

 

CAUTION:  The following links have been culled from the web to illuminate the situation in Switzerland.  Some of these links may lead to websites that present allegations that are unsubstantiated or even false.  No attempt has been made to validate their authenticity or to verify their content.

*** FEATURED ARTICLE ***

Charity reveals tragedy of forced marriages

Adam Beaumont in Geneva, swissinfo, 7 December 2006

www.swissinfo.ch/eng/Home/Archive/Charity_reveals_tragedy_of_forced_marriages.html?cid=5612814

[accessed 28 December 2010]

Thousands of women trapped in forced marriages in Switzerland are suffering severe mental and physical abuse, say the authors of the first Swiss study into the practice.  The charity Surgir (Rise), which carried out the survey, is now calling on the government to draw up a national strategy to aid victims.  Announcing the findings in Geneva on Wednesday, Jacqueline Thibault, the organisation's president, described the scale of the problem as "enormous".  She added that many victims were too afraid to escape forced marriages for fear of reprisals, including so-called "honour killings".

 

*** ARCHIVES ***

Human trafficking allegations involve Swiss diplomatic missions in Pakistan

Canadian Broadcasting Corporation CBC News, 19 May 2006

www.cbc.ca/world/story/2006/05/19/swiss05192006.html

[accessed 28 December 2010]

Switzerland has announced it is replacing all its embassy and consular staff in Pakistan after accusations some employees were involved in a human trafficking racket.

Switzerland shut the visa section at its Islamabad embassy earlier this month, following a Pakistani investigation into the illegal issuing of Swiss visas that has led to a number of arrests.

Swiss Envoys in Pakistan Embroiled in Human Trafficking

IdslamOnline.net, Islamabad, May 8, 2006

slashnews.co.uk/news/2006/05/09/3551/Swiss-Envoys-in-Pakistan-Embroiled-in-Human-Trafficking

[accessed 28 December 2010]

The issue came to the surface after local media started highlighting the plight of Pakistani visa applicants who complained of sexual harassment by Swiss embassy officials.

Charity reveals tragedy of forced marriages

Adam Beaumont in Geneva, swissinfo, 7 December 2006

www.swissinfo.ch/eng/Home/Archive/Charity_reveals_tragedy_of_forced_marriages.html?cid=5612814

[accessed 28 December 2010]

Thousands of women trapped in forced marriages in Switzerland are suffering severe mental and physical abuse, say the authors of the first Swiss study into the practice.  The charity Surgir (Rise), which carried out the survey, is now calling on the government to draw up a national strategy to aid victims.  Announcing the findings in Geneva on Wednesday, Jacqueline Thibault, the organisation's president, described the scale of the problem as "enormous".  She added that many victims were too afraid to escape forced marriages for fear of reprisals, including so-called "honour killings".

Women’s groups highlight cabaret club abuses

Isobel Leybold in Zurich, swissinfo, 13 Jan 2004

www.swissinfo.ch/eng/Home/Archive/Women_s_groups_highlight_cabaret_club_abuses.html?cid=3714668

[accessed 28 December 2010]

Cabaret dancers in Switzerland will still face violence and sexual exploitation, despite attempts to improve their lot, according to women’s groups.

About 1,200 women come to the country a year, usually on short-term permits, to work in Switzerland’s 400 cabaret clubs.  But at press conference in Zurich on Tuesday, ProKoRe, an umbrella group for organisations lobbying for improved rights for sex workers, said that abuses including dishonesty over pay, violence and sexual exploitation were still rife.

Human Rights Reports » 2005 Country Reports on Human Rights Practices

U.S. Dept of State Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor, March 8, 2006

www.state.gov/g/drl/rls/hrrpt/2005/61678.htm

[accessed 28 December 2010]

TRAFFICKING IN PERSONS – Trafficking into the country is primarily performed by individuals and small groups related through ethnic, clan, or family ties, as well as, occasionally, organized criminals. Traffickers often forced victims into prostitution and in many cases subjected them to physical and sexual violence, threatened them or their families, encouraged drug addiction, withheld their documents, and incarcerated them. Many victims were forced to work in salons or clubs to pay for travel expenses and forged documents and found themselves dependent on the traffickers. Generally the victims were unable to read, write, or speak the country's languages and were afraid to seek help from the authorities.

Concluding Observations of the Committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC)

UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, 7 June 2002

www1.umn.edu/humanrts/crc/switzerland2002.html

[accessed 28 December 2010]

[36] The Committee welcomes the entry into force of article 268(c) of the Civil Code which will allow adoptive children to know their biological parents and the ratification process expected to be completed in 2003 of the Hague Convention of 29 May 1993 on Protection of Children an Co-operation in respect of Inter-country Adoption. However, the Committee remains concerned that children adopted abroad shall wait two years before being formally adopted which can lead to discrimination and statelessness. In addition, the Committee is concerned that, because of the inadequate follow-up, cases of ill treatment of children by adoptive parents have been reported.

[52] While welcoming the amendments to the Penal Code prohibiting the possession of hard-core pornography, including child pornography and the establishment of a new centre against cyber-crime in 2003, the Committee remains concerned at the lack of knowledge about the scope of sexual exploitation of children, in particular vulnerable groups, in the State party.

Freedom House Country Report - Political Rights: 1   Civil Liberties: 1   Status: Free

2009 Edition

www.freedomhouse.org/report/freedom-world/2009/switzerland

[accessed 28 June 2012]

All material used herein reproduced under the fair use exception of 17 USC § 107 for noncommercial, nonprofit, and educational use.  PLEASE RESPECT COPYRIGHTS OF COMPONENT ARTICLES.  Cite this webpage as: Patt, Prof. Martin, "Human Trafficking & Modern-day Slavery - Switzerland", http://gvnet.com/humantrafficking/Switzerland.htm, [accessed <date>]

 

 

Torture in  [Switzerland]  [other countries]
Human Trafficking in  [Switzerland]  [other countries]
Street Children in  [Switzerland]  [other countries]
Child Prostitution in  [Switzerland]  [other countries]