Torture in  [El Salvador]  [other countries]
Human Trafficking in  [El Salvador]  [other countries]
Street Children in  [El Salvador]  [other countries]
Child Prostitution in  [El Salvador]  [other countries]
 

Human Trafficking & Modern-day Slavery

In the early years of the 21st Century                                              gvnet.com/humantrafficking/ElSalvador.htm

Republic of El Salvador

The smallest country in Central America, El Salvador has the third largest economy, but growth has been modest in recent years.

In late 2006, the government and the Millennium Challenge Corporation signed a five-year, $461 million compact to stimulate economic growth and reduce poverty in the country's northern region through investments in education, public services, enterprise development, and transportation infrastructure.  [The World Factbook, U.S.C.I.A. 2009]

Description: Description: ElSalvador

El Salvador is a source, transit, and destination country for women and children trafficked for the purposes of commercial sexual exploitation and forced labor. Most victims are Salvadoran women and girls trafficked within the country from rural to urban areas for commercial sexual exploitation, although some adults and children are trafficked internally for forced agricultural labor. The majority of foreign victims are women and children from Nicaragua, Honduras, Guatemala, Mexico, and Colombia who travel to El Salvador in response to job offers, but are subsequently forced into prostitution or domestic servitude. Some adults and children from neighboring countries are subject to forced labor in agriculture and apparel assembly.   - U.S. State Dept Trafficking in Persons Report, June, 2009   [full country report]

 

 

CAUTION:  The following links have been culled from the web to illuminate the situation in El Salvador.  Some of these links may lead to websites that present allegations that are unsubstantiated or even false.  No attempt has been made to validate their authenticity or to verify their content.

*** FEATURED ARTICLE ***

Testimony of Sonia Beatriz Lara Campos

The National Labor Committee, October 1999

At one time this article had been archived and may possibly still be accessible [here]

[accessed 5 September 2011]

About 800 people work there.  There are 8 production lines, with 60 to 63 people in each, plus other sections.   The work shift is Monday to Friday, beginning at 6:50am.  They give us between 12 and 12:55 for lunch, with no other break.  Leaving time is 7pm.  On Saturdays we worked from 6:50am to 4pm. 

Last year in April we began to work at night.  We worked from Monday to Friday 6:50am to 7pm, and from 7:30pm to 10:30pm.  On Saturdays we worked from 6:50am until 7pm.  And on Sunday we worked from 6:50am to 5pm.  Or, if we weren’t going to work on Sunday, we would work on Saturday all night until 5:00 on Sunday morning.  

The overtime hours, and working on Sundays, was obligatory.  As an inspector, I was required to work all these hours on my feet.

El Salvador: Where are the "disappeared" children ?

Amnesty International, Index Number: AMR 29/004/2003,  28 July 2003

www.amnesty.org/es/documents/AMR29/004/2003/en/

[accessed 24 February 2015]

Thousands of people disappeared in El Salvador during the armed conflict that shattered the country between 1980 and 1991. Hundreds, probably thousands, of them were children. Their families have been looking for them, as experience has shown that many are alive but unaware of their circumstances and identity. Government authorities are not helping.

 

 

*** ARCHIVES ***

Salvadoran child may be victim of human trafficking

News5, Channel 5 Belize, April 28, 2006

edition.channel5belize.com/archives/9435

[accessed 29 April 2012]

But what would a small Salvadoran be doing in Belize unaccompanied? That's the scary question police are now trying to answer. If you have any information that may assist authorities, please contact the nearest police station or call 0-800-922-TIPS.

Freedom House Country Report - Political Rights: 2   Civil Liberties: 3   Status: Free

2009 Edition

www.freedomhouse.org/report/freedom-world/2009/el-salvador

[accessed 26 June 2012]

Human Rights Overview

Human Rights Watch

www.hrw.org/americas/el-salvador

[accessed 3 February 2011]

U.S. Library of Congress - Country Study

Library of Congress Call Number F1483 .B55 1990

lcweb2.loc.gov/frd/cs/svtoc.html

[accessed 3 February 2011]

Traffick

Terry Eastland, The Weekly Standard, Feb 11, 2004

www.weeklystandard.com/Content/Public/Articles/000/000/003/718xfsdl.asp

[accessed 3 February 2011]

[scroll down]

Last year, Soto enhanced his criminality by becoming a slaveowner: He told women (from El Salvador and Honduras) that they couldn't leave his safe houses until they had "worked off" the debt they owed for being smuggled into the United States. Soto meant no such thing. During the day, the women worked as domestics for no pay. When night fell, the raping began.

Children Trade School for Sugar Fields

Alberto Barrera, Reuters, Caserio La Asuncion, El Salvador, 7 July 2004

www.thefreelibrary.com/Children+trade+school+for+sugar+fields.-a0119508423

[accessed 16 July 2013]

Twelve-year-old Joel Rivera missed school all last year after he slashed his leg to the bone with a machete working in El Salvador sugar fields to help his mother and three siblings survive. "I've been working since I was 9," Joel said proudly. He is among an estimated 5,000 to 30,000 children--some as young as 8--trading school for dangerous work on the nation's sugar plantations.

El Salvador: Where are the "disappeared" children ?

Amnesty International, Index Number: AMR 29/004/2003,  28 July 2003

www.amnesty.org/es/documents/AMR29/004/2003/en/

[accessed 24 February 2015]

Thousands of people disappeared in El Salvador during the armed conflict that shattered the country between 1980 and 1991. Hundreds, probably thousands, of them were children. Their families have been looking for them, as experience has shown that many are alive but unaware of their circumstances and identity. Government authorities are not helping.

U.S. Apparel Companies Hide Starvation Wages Behind Local Minimum Wage Hoax

The National Labor Committee

At one time this article had been archived and may possibly still be accessible [here]

[accessed 5 September 2011]

Columbia University graduate students have documented that the “legal” minimum wage in El Salvador was arbitrarily set. In an in-depth case study of El Salvador, they show that the legal minimum wage provides less than one-third of the basic living costs for the averaged-sized family of 4.3 people.

Testimony of Sonia Beatriz Lara Campos

The National Labor Committee, October 1999

At one time this article had been archived and may possibly still be accessible [here]

[accessed 5 September 2011]

About 800 people work there.  There are 8 production lines, with 60 to 63 people in each, plus other sections.   The work shift is Monday to Friday, beginning at 6:50am.  They give us between 12 and 12:55 for lunch, with no other break.  Leaving time is 7pm.  On Saturdays we worked from 6:50am to 4pm. 

Last year in April we began to work at night.  We worked from Monday to Friday 6:50am to 7pm, and from 7:30pm to 10:30pm.  On Saturdays we worked from 6:50am until 7pm.  And on Sunday we worked from 6:50am to 5pm.  Or, if we weren’t going to work on Sunday, we would work on Saturday all night until 5:00 on Sunday morning.  

The overtime hours, and working on Sundays, was obligatory.  As an inspector, I was required to work all these hours on my feet.

Testimony of Maria Eva Nerio Ponce

The National Labor Committee, October 1999

At one time this article had been archived and may possibly still be accessible [here]

[accessed 5 September 2011]

At this factory, you are required to work from 6:40am to 7pm every day, with a small 15-minute break in the morning, and lunch from 11:45 to 12:40.  Saturdays you work until 11am or until 4pm.  When there was work, at times one was obligated to work until 11pm.  They paid us the minimum wage of 538 colones every two weeks plus production and a small bonus for working overtime.  I usually could earn 950 colones, or at the most, working many overtime hours, 1,100.

The Department of Labor’s 2004 Findings on the Worst Forms of Child Labor

U.S. Dept of Labor Bureau of International Labor Affairs, 2005

www.dol.gov/ilab/media/reports/iclp/tda2004/el-salvador.htm

[accessed 3 February 2011]

INCIDENCE AND NATURE OF CHILD LABOR - El Salvador is a source, transit, and destination country for children trafficked for commercial sexual exploitation.  Salvadoran girls are trafficked to Mexico, the United States, and other Central American countries.  Some children are also trafficked internally.  Children from Nicaragua, Honduras, and South America have been trafficked to bars in major Salvadoran cities, where they are then forced to engage in prostitution.

Human Rights Reports » 2005 Country Reports on Human Rights Practices

U.S. Dept of State Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor, March 8, 2006

www.state.gov/g/drl/rls/hrrpt/2005/61727.htm

[accessed 3 February 2011]

TRAFFICKING IN PERSONS – Although there were no firm estimates on the extent of trafficking, the country was a point of origin and destination for international trafficking in women and children, particularly the harboring of child prostitutes. There was evidence that the country was a transit point for girls trafficked to Mexico, the United States, neighboring Central American countries, and elsewhere. Some children also were trafficked internally to cities, particularly to Acajutla and San Miguel, and to bars and border regions. Sex trafficking of minors occurred within the country's borders, as did sex trafficking in which commercial sex was induced by force, fraud, or coercion. Most international trafficking victims came from Nicaragua, Honduras, and South America. Particular groups at special risk for trafficking were girls and young women from 12 to 19 years of age, persons from rural and poor areas, single mothers in poor areas, adolescents without formal schooling, adolescent mothers, unemployed young men, and foreign girls. In October the ILO stated that children were most vulnerable to become victims of trafficking.

According to immigration authorities, the principal traffickers in the country were employment agencies, which offered inducements for work in beauty salons, as models, in gyms, as maids, or in factories. The PNC reported that the most common methods of obtaining victims were kidnapping, lucrative job offers, and inducement into prostitution by family, friends, and smugglers.

Concluding Observations of the Committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC)

UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, 30 June 2004

www1.umn.edu/humanrts/crc/elsalvador2004.html

[accessed 3 February 2011]

[63] The Committee is concerned about the extent of sexual exploitation and trafficking in the State party and about the lack of effective programs to address this problem. It also regrets the lack of information on assistance and reintegration programs for children who have been subject to sexual exploitation and trafficking.

All material used herein reproduced under the fair use exception of 17 USC § 107 for noncommercial, nonprofit, and educational use.  PLEASE RESPECT COPYRIGHTS OF COMPONENT ARTICLES.  Cite this webpage as: Patt, Prof. Martin, "Human Trafficking & Modern-day Slavery – El Salvador", http://gvnet.com/humantrafficking/ElSalvador.htm, [accessed <date>]

 

 

Torture in  [El Salvador]  [other countries]
Human Trafficking in  [El Salvador]  [other countries]
Street Children in  [El Salvador]  [other countries]
Child Prostitution in  [El Salvador]  [other countries]