Torture in  [Chile]  [other countries]
Human Trafficking in  [Chile]  [other countries]
Street Children in  [Chile]  [other countries]
Child Prostitution in  [Chile]  [other countries]
 

Human Trafficking & Modern-day Slavery

In the early years of the 21st Century                                                          gvnet.com/humantrafficking/Chile.htm

Republic of Chile

Chile has a market-oriented economy characterized by a high level of foreign trade and a reputation for strong financial institutions and sound policy that have given it the strongest sovereign bond rating in South America. Exports account for 40% of GDP, with commodities making up some three-quarters of total exports. Copper alone provides one-third of government revenue.  [The World Factbook, U.S.C.I.A. 2009]

Description: Description: Chile

Chile is a source, transit, and destination country for men, women, and children trafficked for the purposes of commercial sexual exploitation and labor trafficking. Within the country, many victims are Chilean women and girls who respond to false job offers and subsequently are subjected to forced prostitution. Chilean women and girls also are trafficked for involuntary prostitution and labor exploitation to neighboring countries such as Argentina, Peru, and Bolivia, as well as Western Europe. Foreign women from Argentina, Bolivia, Peru, Colombia, and Paraguay, in addition to Asian countries such as China, are lured to Chile with fraudulent job offers and subsequently coerced into prostitution or domestic servitude. - U.S. State Dept Trafficking in Persons Report, June, 2009 [full country report]

 

CAUTION:  The following links have been culled from the web to illuminate the situation in Chile.  Some of these links may lead to websites that present allegations that are unsubstantiated or even false.  No attempt has been made to validate their authenticity or to verify their content.

*** FEATURED ARTICLE ***

iAbolish Country Report: Chile

iabolish.org | The American Anti-Slavery Group

www.iabolish.org/slavery_today/country_reports/cl.html

[Last access date unavailable]

COUNTRY BACKGROUND - Slavery has a legacy in Chile. In the 1980s, during the former dictatorship, "dignity colonies" were operating. These were clandestine camps where many of the desparecidos (the 'disappeared' people) were sexually exploited and trapped in a system of forced labor. These were only recently discovered. The kinds of slavery that exist in Chile today also hardly receive any immediate media attention.

THE PROCESS OF ENSLAVEMENT - Chile is a destination for Bolivian minors who are lured into the country under false pretenses and promises of higher wages in a country economically more stable than Bolivia. Chile is also a country where human traffickers facilitate and promote the movement of people from Asia to American cities, such as Los Angeles and Houston, for the purposes of debt bondage and sexual exploitation.

 

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Child trafficking projects in Central and South America

stopchildtrafficking.org,  01.06.2005

At one time this article had been archived and may possibly still be accessible [here]

[accessed 4 September 2011]

INVOLVING THE GOVERNMENTS - Description: Description: http://www.stopchildtrafficking.org/site/clear.gifTo be able to protect young boys and girls from child trafficking, it is primarily important to improve the basic legal framework. Thanks to the initiative of DNI and Infante, partner organizations of terre des hommes in Bolivia, amendments to laws making child trafficking a punishable offence are about to be passed. Similarly, the Chilean organization, Raices, works closely with the local police authorities. In addition, a commission with representatives from Chile, Peru and Bolivia is working on a strategic and a more effective approach against cross-border child trafficking.

iAbolish Country Report: Chile

iabolish.org | The American Anti-Slavery Group

www.iabolish.org/slavery_today/country_reports/cl.html

[Last access date unavailable]

COUNTRY BACKGROUND - Slavery has a legacy in Chile. In the 1980s, during the former dictatorship, "dignity colonies" were operating. These were clandestine camps where many of the desparecidos (the 'disappeared' people) were sexually exploited and trapped in a system of forced labor. These were only recently discovered. The kinds of slavery that exist in Chile today also hardly receive any immediate media attention.

THE PROCESS OF ENSLAVEMENT - Chile is a destination for Bolivian minors who are lured into the country under false pretenses and promises of higher wages in a country economically more stable than Bolivia. Chile is also a country where human traffickers facilitate and promote the movement of people from Asia to American cities, such as Los Angeles and Houston, for the purposes of debt bondage and sexual exploitation.

The Department of Labor’s 2004 Findings on the Worst Forms of Child Labor

U.S. Dept of Labor Bureau of International Labor Affairs, 2005

www.dol.gov/ilab/media/reports/iclp/tda2004/chile.htm

[accessed 28 January 2011]

INCIDENCE AND NATURE OF CHILD LABOR - In 2003, the Government of Chile estimated that there were approximately 3,700 children involved in some form of commercial sexual exploitation.  Children are also trafficked internally for the purpose of commercial sexual exploitation.

Human Rights Reports » 2005 Country Reports on Human Rights Practices

U.S. Dept of State Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor, March 8, 2006

www.state.gov/g/drl/rls/hrrpt/2005/61720.htm

[accessed 28 January 2011]

TRAFFICKING IN PERSONS – Within the country victims reportedly were trafficked from rural areas to such urban areas as Santiago, Iquique, and Valparaiso. Law enforcement authorities stated that small numbers of victims were trafficked to neighboring countries (Argentina, Peru, and Bolivia), the United States, Europe, and Asia. Victims reportedly entered the country from Peru, Argentina, Colombia, and Bolivia, although it was difficult to distinguish trafficked persons from economic migrants.

Anecdotal reports suggested that young women were the primary targets for trafficking to other countries. Traffickers reportedly used newspaper advertisements for models and product promoters to lure girls, ages 11 to 17, into prostitution. Law enforcement agencies indicated that traffickers looking for children also targeted economically disadvantaged families, arguing to the parents that they were giving the child an opportunity for a better life. Men from less-affluent rural areas may be recruited into abusive labor situations in deep-sea fishing or ranching operations.

Concluding Observations of the Committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC)

UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, 1 February 2002

www1.umn.edu/humanrts/crc/chile2002.html

[accessed 28 January 2011]

[49] The Committee, while noting that the State party has ratified ILO Conventions No. 138 concerning Minimum Age for Admission to Employment and No. 182 concerning the Prohibition and Immediate Action for the Elimination of the Worst Forms of Child Labour and increased the minimum age for admission to work to 15, expresses its deep concern at the large number of children, including those under 15, who are exploited economically, especially in the farming sector, and the large number who have to leave school because they cannot conciliate work and school.

The Protection Project - Human Rights Reports of The Americas - Chile [DOC]

The Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS), The Johns Hopkins University

www.protectionproject.org/human_rights_reports/report_documents/chile.doc

[Last accessed 2009]

FORMS OF TRAFFICKING - One study reported that 50 percent of foreign women working in eastern Santiago’s late-night establishments were victims of trafficking. Foreign women come to Santiago to look for work, and from Santiago they are trafficked to other parts of the country.  Bolivian women and children are trafficked to Chile for prostitution and domestic work.

A Chilean woman was allegedly involved in a network that was suspected of trafficking young Chilean women for prostitution in Japan.  Known as the “Chilean Geisha,” she made a fortune with her best-selling memoirs, her music albums, and even a movie about her life. Corporación La Morada, one of Chile’s leading women’s organizations, filed a lawsuit against the “geisha” for trafficking in persons; in June 2004, the government’s Council for the Defense of State joined the legal action against her.

Freedom House Country Report - Political Rights: 1   Civil Liberties: 1   Status: Free

2009 Edition

www.freedomhouse.org/report/freedom-world/2009/chile

[accessed 26 June 2012]

Human Rights Overview by Human Rights Watch – Defending Human Rights Worldwide

www.hrw.org/americas/chile

[accessed 28 January 2011]

U.S. Library of Congress - Country Study

Library of Congress Call Number F3058 .C5223 1994

lcweb2.loc.gov/frd/cs/cltoc.html

[accessed 28 January 2011]

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Torture in  [Chile]  [other countries]
Human Trafficking in  [Chile]  [other countries]
Street Children in  [Chile]  [other countries]
Child Prostitution in  [Chile]  [other countries]