Torture in  [Brunei Darussalam]  [other countries]
Human Trafficking in  [Brunei Darussalam]  [other countries]
Street Children in  [Brunei Darussalam]  [other countries]
Child Prostitution in  [Brunei Darussalam]  [other countries]
 

Human Trafficking & Modern-day Slavery

In the early years of the 21st Century                                                      gvnet.com/humantrafficking/Brunei.htm

State of Brunei Darussalam

Brunei has a small well-to-do economy that encompasses a mixture of foreign and domestic entrepreneurship, government regulation, welfare measures, and village tradition.

The government provides for all medical services and free education through the university level and subsidizes rice and housing.

Plans for the future include upgrading the labor force, reducing unemployment, strengthening the banking and tourist sectors, increasing agricultural production, and, in general, further widening the economic base beyond oil and gas.  [The World Factbook, U.S.C.I.A. 2009]

Description: Description: Brunei

Brunei is a destination country for men and women trafficked for the purpose of forced labor and commercial sexual exploitation. Brunei is mainly a destination country for men and women recruited from Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Pakistan, India, Bangladesh, the People’s Republic of China (PRC), and Thailand for domestic or low-skilled labor. A limited number of the 88,000 foreign workers in Brunei face poor labor conditions that amount to involuntary servitude.   - U.S. State Dept Trafficking in Persons Report, June, 2009   [full country report]

 

 

CAUTION:  The following links have been culled from the web to illuminate the situation in Brunei Darussalam.  Some of these links may lead to websites that present allegations that are unsubstantiated or even false.  No attempt has been made to verify their authenticity or to validate their content.

*** FEATURED ARTICLE ***

No Human Trafficking Cases In Brunei: US State Department

Rosli Abidin Yahya, Borneo Bulletin, Bandar Seri Begawan , March 11, 2006

www.accessmylibrary.com/article-1G1-143195075/brunei-no-human-trafficking.html

[accessed 1 September 2011]

Since February last year, the Labour Department has brought cases directly against employers who did not pay their workers. Formerly, such cases were brought by the Attorney General's Office and took much longer to prosecute. In March last year a military, officer was tined approximately $4,000 (B$6,668) or a jail sentence in default for not paying his maid for more than 23 months.

Further mentioned in the annual report was the government's intervention in labour disputes. Supporting this was when in September approximately 300 garment factory workers protested publicly over unpaid salaries of up to 6 months.

Employers have been warned that they would be prosecuted if they defaulted on workers' salary payments or paid them late.

In September the government filed charges for non-payment of wages against the board of directors of the factory that employed the garment workers; among the accused was a former cabinet minister.

 

*** ARCHIVES ***

No Human Trafficking Cases In Brunei: US State Department

Rosli Abidin Yahya, Borneo Bulletin, Bandar Seri Begawan , March 11, 2006

www.accessmylibrary.com/article-1G1-143195075/brunei-no-human-trafficking.html

[accessed 1 September 2011]

Since February last year, the Labour Department has brought cases directly against employers who did not pay their workers. Formerly, such cases were brought by the Attorney General's Office and took much longer to prosecute. In March last year a military, officer was tined approximately $4,000 (B$6,668) or a jail sentence in default for not paying his maid for more than 23 months.

Further mentioned in the annual report was the government's intervention in labour disputes. Supporting this was when in September approximately 300 garment factory workers protested publicly over unpaid salaries of up to 6 months.

Employers have been warned that they would be prosecuted if they defaulted on workers' salary payments or paid them late.

In September the government filed charges for non-payment of wages against the board of directors of the factory that employed the garment workers; among the accused was a former cabinet minister.

Philippine Embassy In Brunei Saves Two Filipinas From Human Trafficking

News Release, Philippine Consulate General in New York, 08 September 2004

www.pcgny.net/news/news287.htm

[accessed 24 January 2011]

Secretary of Foreign Affairs Alberto G. Romulo commended the  Philippine Embassy in Brunei Darussalam for its collaborative efforts with the Philippine Embassy in Kuala Lumpur and the Brunei Immigration authorities that led to the rescue of two Filipina workers who were victims of human trafficking and forced to become sex workers.     The two Filipinas were later repatriated to the Philippines through the efforts of the Embassy.

In her report to the DFA, Philippine Ambassador to Brunei Virginia H. Benavidez said that the official statements issued by the women at the Philippine Embassy in Brunei showed that they were beguiled by a certain Loida Jose with business address in Kamias, Quezon City, to work as waitresses in Brunei. Supposedly these two victims would earn P40,000 each. Instead they discovered upon arrival that they were to work as guest relations officers (GROs) at the Fun Pub and Crossroads Club, which are reputed to be sex dens in Labuan.  “By the time we took custody of the two Filipina victims, they have been working as prostitutes for more than a month,” Ambassador Benavidez reported.

Stateless And Vulnerable To Human Trafficking In Thailand [PDF]

Vital Voices Global Partnership, June 2007

www.humantrafficking.org/uploads/publications/Vital_Voices_Stateless_and_Vulnerable_to_Human_Trafficking_in_Thailand.pdf

[accessed 21 July 2013]

[page 28]  V RECOMMENDATIONS TO THE INTERNATIONAL COMMUNITY - In order to reduce the impact of statelessness on non-citizens, opening up access to education and healthcare services to children and permitting some forms of legitimate labor to those awaiting proof of citizenship would eliminate the link between statelessness and human trafficking. In Brunei, many ethnic Chinese do not have the right to citizenship. As in Thailand, without access to citizenship these stateless people in Brunei do not have access to subsidized healthcare services and other government-provided services. While the stateless individuals suffer from some of the same problems faced in Thailand, Brunei offers free education to "stateless persons and permanent residents."146 By providing education, Brunei relieves one of the problems for its stateless people that make them vulnerable to exploitation.

Human Trafficking Cases Increased

Sun Star, 2008/01/08

– Source: www.sunstar.com.ph/static/gen/2008/01/08/news/human.trafficking.cases.increased.html

traffickingproject.blogspot.com/2008/03/trafficking-challenges-in-philippines.html

[accessed 19 January 2011]

Sheila, Valerie and Bridget (not their real names), who hailed from poor families here, have set their sights to as far as Manila, Brunei, and Japan for employment to alleviate the plight of their respective families.  However, instead of working as domestic helpers, they ended up as prostitutes. Their recruiters vanished like thin smokes in the air.

Coalition Against Trafficking in Women - Brunei

Coalition Against Trafficking in Women

www.catwinternational.org/factbook/Brunei.php

[accessed 24 January 2011]

CASE - Prince Jefri Bolkiah of Brunei, brother to the Sultan of Brunei, was sued for US$90 million by a former Miss USA. Shannon Marketic claimed that she and six other women were held as virtual prisoners for 32 days and told they were expected to engage in sexual activity at all-night parties. A U.S. District Judge ruled that Prince Jefri was protected under the Foreign Sovereign Immunity Act and cannot be sued in the United States.

Human Rights Reports » 2005 Country Reports on Human Rights Practices

U.S. Dept of State Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor, March 8, 2006

www.state.gov/g/drl/rls/hrrpt/2005/61602.htm

[accessed 24 January 2011]

TRAFFICKING IN PERSONS – The country has been a destination for a small number of persons trafficked for sexual exploitation from China and within the region. There were very few identifiable cases of trafficking, and the majority of women who entered the country as sex workers were considered to have done so voluntarily. Immigration, labor, and religious regulations that criminalize prostitution also served to deter trafficking. There were reports of foreign household laborers who worked under harsh conditions and whose freedom of movement was restricted.

SECTION 6 WORKER RIGHTS – [e] At least 100 thousand foreign persons worked in the country. There were reports of foreign maids and other domestic workers who worked exceptionally long hours, did not have a rest day, and had their liberty severely restricted. There also were isolated reports of employers who beat domestic employees or did not provide them with adequate food. The government prosecuted some cases; employers found guilty of abuses typically were fined and asked to compensate the victim.

Concluding Observations of the Committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC)

UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, 3 October 2003

www1.umn.edu/humanrts/crc/bruneidarussalam2003.htm

[accessed 24 January 2011]

[14] The Committee is concerned that insufficient efforts have been made to involve civil society in the full implementation of the Convention and in the reporting process

[18] The Committee is concerned at the existing lack of systematic and comprehensive collection of disaggregated data for all areas covered by the Convention and in relation to all groups of children in order to monitor and evaluate progress achieved and assess the impact of policies adopted with respect to children.

[20] The Committee is aware of the measures undertaken to promote widespread awareness of the principles and provisions of the Convention and welcomes the translation of the Convention into Malay, but is of the opinion that these measures are not sufficient and need to be strengthened by providing the necessary resources.  In this respect, the Committee is concerned at the lack of a systematic plan to introduce training and raise awareness among professional groups working for and with children.

[41] The Committee welcomes the enactment of the Islamic Adoption of the Children’s Order 2001 and Adoption of Children Order 2001, which both came into force on 26 March 2001 but remains concerned that the State party has not ratified the 1993 Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Cooperation in Respect of Inter-country Adoption.

[57] The Committee recommends that the State party ratify the Optional Protocols to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the sale of children, child prostitution and child pornography, and on the involvement of children in armed conflict.

The Protection Project - Brunei Darussalam [DOC]

The Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS), The Johns Hopkins University

www.protectionproject.org/human_rights_reports/report_documents/brunei.doc

[Last accessed 2009]

FORMS OF TRAFFICKING - Asian women end up as sex slaves in Brunei Darussalam after being falsely promised employment as housemaids.  For instance, the Philippine Embassy there recently assisted in the repatriation of two Filipina victims who were lured to Brunei Darussalam with false promises of jobs as guest relations officers or restaurant helpers but were instead forced into prostitution upon their arrival.  Indonesian babies are sold to buyers from Brunei Darussalam, Malaysia, and other countries.  Young people from Brunei Darussalam and several other countries in southeastern Asia are reportedly trafficked to Australia using student visas; in reality, however, they rarely attend any classes but instead are forced by their traffickers to sell drugs or to engage in prostitution.

Freedom House Country Report - Political Rights: 6   Civil Liberties: 5   Status: Not Free

2009 Edition

www.freedomhouse.org/report/freedom-world/2009/brunei

[accessed 26 June 2012]

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Torture in  [Brunei Darussalam]  [other countries]
Human Trafficking in  [Brunei Darussalam]  [other countries]
Street Children in  [Brunei Darussalam]  [other countries]
Child Prostitution in  [Brunei Darussalam]  [other countries]