Torture in  [Antigua & Barbuda]  [other countries]
Human Trafficking in  [Antigua & Barbuda]  [other countries]
Street Children in  [Antigua & Barbuda]  [other countries]
Child Prostitution in  [Antigua & Barbuda]  [other countries]
 

Human Trafficking & Modern-day Slavery

In the early years of the 21st Century                                      gvnet.com/humantrafficking/Antigua&Barbuda.htm

Antigua & Barbuda

Antigua has a relatively high GDP per capita in comparison to most other Caribbean nations. The economy experienced solid growth from 2003 to 2007, reaching over 12% in 2006 driven by a construction boom in hotels and housing associated with the Cricket World Cup. Growth dropped off in 2008 with the end of the boom. Tourism continues to dominate the economy, accounting for nearly 60% of GDP and 40% of investment. The dual-island nation's agricultural production is focused on the domestic market and constrained by a limited water supply and a labor shortage stemming from the lure of higher wages in tourism and construction.  [The World Factbook, U.S.C.I.A. 2009]

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Antigua&Barbuda

Antigua and Barbuda is a destination country for women trafficked from Guyana, Haiti, Jamaica, and the Dominican Republic for the purposes of sexual exploitation; it may also be a destination country for women trafficked for the purposes of forced domestic servitude. - U.S. State Dept Trafficking in Persons Report, June, 2009 [full country report]

 

CAUTION:  The following links have been culled from the web to illuminate the situation in Antigua & Barbuda.  Some of these links may lead to websites that present allegations that are unsubstantiated or even false.  No attempt has been made to validate their authenticity or to verify their content.

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Assessing human trafficking in Antigua and Barbuda

UN Human Settlements Programme (UN-HABITAT), Antigua And Barbuda: National Urban Profile, 2011

[accessed 11 September 2014]

[page 21]

The victims identified by the US in Antigua and Barbuda’s case were women trafficked from Guyana, Haiti, Jamaica, and the Dominican Republic, for the purposes of sexual exploitation and forced domestic servitude.   The report further stated that well-financed businessmen who act as pimps and brothel owners traffic women into the four main, illegal brothels that operate in Antigua, as well as to private residences that operate as brothels

In its assessment of Antigua and Barbuda, the TIP 2009 Report indicated that brothel managers confiscated passports and threatened women with deportation until they repay the brothel owner for travel and other expenses. Pointing to systemic causes, the report further stated that some victims trafficked for the purpose of sexual exploitation had been given work permits as "entertainers" to legally enter the country.   The reality is that victims enter the country both legally and illegally. They hold legitimate documents authorising them to work in various fields

However, it is important to note that not all women and men brought in to Antigua and Barbuda or transported throughout the Caribbean to work within the sex trade are victims of human trafficking. For many, sex work is a choice, albeit a quite complicated and socially and economically complex one.

 

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Security minister calls for regional conference on human trafficking

Antigua Observer News, 9 June 2012

antiguaobserver.com/security-minister-calls-for-regional-conference-on-human-trafficking/

[accessed 11 September 2014]

During his remarks, Dr Cort focused on the victims of human trafficking, saying that there was a need to reorient our thinking and view of persons who are victims of trafficking and there was a need to put measures in place to look after these victims.

IOM Regional Coordination Officer Rui Oliveira Reis, in his remarks, said that the IOM recognised that Antigua & Barbuda is committed to combating human trafficking, and as such, they have seen significant progress on the island. He said the IOM would continue to support the island in this area, as well as other areas such as boarder management control and labour and migration.

Assessing human trafficking in Antigua and Barbuda

UN Human Settlements Programme (UN-HABITAT), Antigua And Barbuda: National Urban Profile, 2011

[accessed 11 September 2014]

[page 21]

The victims identified by the US in Antigua and Barbuda’s case were women trafficked from Guyana, Haiti, Jamaica, and the Dominican Republic, for the purposes of sexual exploitation and forced domestic servitude.   The report further stated that well-financed businessmen who act as pimps and brothel owners traffic women into the four main, illegal brothels that operate in Antigua, as well as to private residences that operate as brothels

In its assessment of Antigua and Barbuda, the TIP 2009 Report indicated that brothel managers confiscated passports and threatened women with deportation until they repay the brothel owner for travel and other expenses. Pointing to systemic causes, the report further stated that some victims trafficked for the purpose of sexual exploitation had been given work permits as "entertainers" to legally enter the country.   The reality is that victims enter the country both legally and illegally. They hold legitimate documents authorising them to work in various fields

However, it is important to note that not all women and men brought in to Antigua and Barbuda or transported throughout the Caribbean to work within the sex trade are victims of human trafficking. For many, sex work is a choice, albeit a quite complicated and socially and economically complex one.

Human Rights Reports » 2008 Country Reports on Human Rights Practices

U.S. Dept of State Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor, February 25, 2009

www.state.gov/g/drl/rls/hrrpt/2008/wha/119144.htm

[accessed 19 January 2011]

TRAFFICKING IN PERSONS – There are no laws that specifically address trafficking in persons, and there were occasional reports of trafficking in women to the country. There were a number of brothels, which were staffed mostly by women from various Caribbean countries who traveled to the country as "entertainers" or "dancers." In some cases brothel owners reportedly retained their documents to exert influence over the victims. However, authorities usually deported the women immediately, before information on possible trafficking could be obtained.

There were two known cases during the year in which persons were trafficked to the country to work in local brothels. Authorities deported one victim and the other voluntarily returned to her home country with the support of the Bureau of Gender Affairs.  In neither case were charges brought against the brothel owners.

The Protection Project - Antigua [DOC]

The Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS), The Johns Hopkins University

www.protectionproject.org/human_rights_reports/report_documents/antigua.doc

[accessed 2009]

FORMS OF TRAFFICKING – Available data suggest that trafficking occurs primarily for the purpose of prostitution. Sex tourism is also part of the trafficking infrastructure in Antigua and Barbuda.   There are reports of trafficking in children for commercial sexual exploitation and pornography. In 2001, the police arrested and charged four people in connection with an ongoing investigation into an alleged child prostitution and pornography ring. Girls as young as 13 were allegedly being sexually exploited. The ring was discovered after one of the girls was forced to have an abortion.

Freedom House Country Report - Political Rights: 2   Civil Liberties: 2   Status: Free

2009 Edition

www.freedomhouse.org/report/freedom-world/2009/antigua-and-barbuda

[accessed 26 June 2012]

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Torture in  [Antigua & Barbuda]  [other countries]
Human Trafficking in  [Antigua & Barbuda]  [other countries]
Street Children in  [Antigua & Barbuda]  [other countries]
Child Prostitution in  [Antigua & Barbuda]  [other countries]