Torture in  [Bahrain]  [other countries]
Human Trafficking in  [Bahrain]  [other countries]
Street Children in  [Bahrain]  [other countries]
Child Prostitution in  [Bahrain]  [other countries]
 

Child Prostitution

The Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children

In the early years of the 21st Century                                                        gvnet.com/childprostitution/Bahrain.htm

Kingdom of Bahrain

With its highly developed communication and transport facilities, Bahrain is home to numerous multinational firms with business in the Gulf. Petroleum production and refining account for over 60% of Bahrain's export receipts, over 70% of government revenues, and 11% of GDP (exclusive of allied industries), underpinning Bahrain's strong economic growth in recent years. Aluminum is Bahrain's second major export after oil.

Unemployment, especially among the young, and the depletion of oil and underground water resources are long-term economic problems.  [The World Factbook, U.S.C.I.A. 2009]

Description: Bahrain

CAUTION:  The following links and accompanying text have been culled from the web to illuminate the situation in Bahrain.  Some of these links may lead to websites that present allegations that are unsubstantiated, misleading or even false.   No attempt has been made to validate their authenticity or to verify their content.

*** ARCHIVES ***

The Department of Labor’s 2004 Findings on the Worst Forms of Child Labor

U.S. Dept of Labor Bureau of International Labor Affairs, 2005

www.dol.gov/ilab/media/reports/iclp/tda2004/bahrain.htm

[accessed 25 February 2011]

CHILD LABOR LAWS AND ENFORCEMENT - Prostitution is illegal under the Penal Code, and the forced prostitution of a child younger than 18 years of age is punishable by up to 10 years imprisonment.

Human Rights Reports » 2005 Country Reports on Human Rights Practices

U.S. Dept of State Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor, March 8, 2006

www.state.gov/g/drl/rls/hrrpt/2005/61686.htm

[accessed 20 January 2011]

CHILDREN - Child prostitution is illegal and there were no reported cases during the year.

Concluding Observations of the Committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC)

UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, 1 February 2002

www1.umn.edu/humanrts/crc/bahrain2002.html

[accessed 25 February 2011]

[49] The Committee recommends that the State party ratify the Optional Protocols to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the sale of children, child prostitution and child pornography, and on the involvement of children in armed conflict.

Crime and Society - A Comparative Criminology Tour of the World

Dr. Robert Winslow, San Diego State University, "A Comparative Criminology Tour of the World"

www-rohan.sdsu.edu/faculty/rwinslow/asia_pacific/bahrain.html

[accessed 13 September 2011]

CHILDREN - In the past, the authorities reportedly returned children arrested for prostitution and other nonpolitical crimes to their families rather than prosecute them, especially for first offenses. There were no reports of child prostitution during the year.

Legislation Of Interpol Member States On Sexual Offences Against Children - Bahrain

Legislation of Interpol member states on sexual offences against children, Bahrain

www.interpol.int/Public/Children/SexualAbuse/NationalLaws/csaBahrain.asp

[accessed 3 April 2011]

IV. CHILD PROSTITUTION - Encouraging male or female under 18 years of age to enter prostitution is punishable by 5 years of imprisonment maximum.  Forcing or enticing male or female under 18 years of age into prostitution is punishable by imprisonment from 3 up to 10 years.

Educational Reform: developments and prospects

Gulf Centre for Strategic Studies, Welcome to Bahrain Brief, June 2004, Volume  5, Issue 5

At one time this article had been archived and may possibly still be accessible [here]

[accessed 13 September 2011]

NEWS SUMMARIES

SHURA COUNCIL SUPPORTS BAHRAINI PARTICIPATION IN CAMPAIGN FOR CHILDREN’S RIGHTS - Child prostitution and pornography are serious problems in all parts of the world, and Bahrain is participating in a global campaign to combat these phenomena. In addition, the country is supporting an international drive to prevent children from being recruited for armed combat. Members of the Shura Council have voiced their support for two United Nations protocols on these issues: one calls for an active campaign against child trafficking, child prostitution and the use of children in pornography, while the other calls for a ban on the recruitment of children into military forces.

5.1 Middle East - State of CSEC/ Attitudes toward CSEC [PDF]

ECPAT International, Looking Back Thinking Forward, November 2000 -- The fourth report on the implementation of the Agenda for Action adopted at the World Congress against Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children held in Stockholm, Sweden, August 1996

At one time this article had been archived and may possibly still be accessible [here]

[accessed 13 September 2011]

In the wealthy oil producing states, (e.g. Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Oman etc), foreigners are often the unfortunate victims of commercial sexual exploitation.  The financial ability to contribute to CSEC, the lack of legal protection measures for foreign children, and the low status of foreigners in society, contributes to CSEC.  Additionally, the high numbers of male foreign workers in these countries create a large demand for prostitution.

Commercial sexual exploitation of children - Middle East/North Africa region

based on the situation analysis written by Dr Najat M’jid for the Arab-African Forum against Commercial Sexual Exploitation, Rabat, Morocco, 24-26 October 2001 -- Source document (in French): Rapport sur la situation de l’exploitation sexuelle des enfants dans la région MENA, 10 septembre 2001

www.unicef.org/events/yokohama/backgound8.html

[accessed 3 April 2011]

These countries also have in common, however, a number of constraints that have hindered preparation of national plans of action. In all the countries of the region, there is cultural resistance to addressing the problem because the subject is largely taboo.  Often the issue is dealt with more generally under headings such as ‘violence’ and ‘trauma’.  This means that there has been no regional consensus on defining CSEC in law; in some countries, for example, it is looked upon as an indecent act, in others as rape, although in all 20 countries there is some section of the penal code that can be invoked against sexual abuse and exploitation.

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Torture in  [Bahrain]  [other countries]
Human Trafficking in  [Bahrain]  [other countries]
Street Children in  [Bahrain]  [other countries]
Child Prostitution in  [Bahrain]  [other countries]