Torture in [Trinidad & Tobago] [other countries]
Human Trafficking in [Trinidad & Tobago] [other countries]
Street Children in [Trinidad & Tobago] [other countries]
Child Prostitution in [Trinidad & Tobago] [other countries]
 

Torture by Police, Forced Disappearance

& Other Ill Treatment

In the early years of the 21st Century gvnet.com/torture/Trinidad&Tobago.htm

Trinidad & Tobago

Trinidad and Tobago has earned a reputation as an excellent investment site for international businesses and has one of the highest growth rates and per capita incomes in Latin America.

Trinidad and Tobago is the leading Caribbean producer of oil and gas, and its economy is heavily dependent upon these resources but it also supplies manufactured goods, notably food and beverages, as well as cement to the Caribbean region.

The Manning administration has benefited from fiscal surpluses fueled by the dynamic export sector; however, declines in oil and gas prices have reduced government revenues which will challenge his government's commitment to maintaining high levels of public investment. [The World Factbook, U.S.C.I.A. 2009]

Description: Description: Trinidad&Tobago

CAUTION:  The following links have been culled from the web to illuminate the situation in Trinidad & Tobago. Some of these links may lead to websites that present allegations that are unsubstantiated or even false.  No attempt has been made to validate their authenticity or to verify their content.

*** ARCHIVES ***

Where Are the Missing People?

Peter Richards, Inter Press Service News Agency IPS, Port Of Spain, 6 Jan 2009

www.ipsnews.net/news.asp?idnews=45311

[accessed 1 January 2011]

www.ipsnews.net/2009/01/trinidad-where-are-the-missing-people/

[accessed 31 August 2016]

When 15-year-old Devika Lalman left her home a few days before Christmas to buy school supplies for the new academic term, her parents had taken all the necessary precautions to ensure her safety. The mother of the Form Three student said she had also given her daughter a cell phone, but all calls to that phone have gone unanswered and the daughter has not been seen since.

"Almost all the women who disappeared left behind a pattern. Their cell phones were switched off. We also heard that they were transported from one house to another before being shipped out." The Sunday Guardian newspaper, which carried out its own investigation, said that the "clandestine local trade, which operates through a well-organised network and is supported by several powerful agencies, is linked to an international human trafficking ring". The paper said that children were being sold for as much as 34,000 dollars and adults for half that amount. "They are mostly used as sex slaves and sometimes for slave labour. Sometimes, they are used to make pay-offs in the drug trade," the paper said, noting that the trafficking also includes young women who were being brought into the country from Venezuela, Colombia and Guyana.

"We recognise that legislation is critically important at this point because without proper legislation, which is really one of the handicaps in the social areas, we could not possibly move forward in terms of consequences for human traffickers," said the party's deputy leader, Dr Sharon Gopaul McNicol, a clinical psychologist. She told a news conference that most of the human trafficking "takes place in small boats where people are drugged and shipped off to other countries, primarily those countries that people don't speak English so there is little chance of the victims being able to get away without much difficulty."

The state of the world's human rights

Amnesty International AI, Annual Report 2013

www.amnesty.org/en/region/trinidad-amp-tobago/report-2013

[accessed 11 Feb 2014]

POLICE AND SECURITY FORCES - There were continued reports of unlawful killings by police. Official claims that police had fired in self-defence were frequently challenged by eyewitnesses.

Atiba Duncan was fatally shot by police in April in the community of Mt Dor Road. Police officers claimed he had pointed a gun at them as they tried to arrest him. However, a forensic pathologist found that he had been shot in the back. Investigations were continuing at the end of the year.

Human Rights Reports 2008 Country Reports on Human Rights Practices

U.S. Dept of State Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor, February 25, 2009

www.state.gov/g/drl/rls/hrrpt/2008/wha/119175.htm

[accessed 14 February 2013]

TORTURE AND OTHER CRUEL, INHUMAN, OR DEGRADING TREATMENT OR PUNISHMENT Although the constitution and the law prohibit such practices, there were credible reports that police officers and prison guards mistreated individuals under arrest or in detention.

Freedom House Country Report - Political Rights: 2 Civil Liberties: 2 Status: Free

2009 Edition

www.freedomhouse.org/report/freedom-world/2009/trinidad-and-tobago

[accessed 14 February 2013]

The judicial branch is independent, though subject to some political pressure and corruption. As a result of rising crime rates, the court system is severely backlogged, in some cases for up to five years, with an estimated 20,000 criminal cases awaiting trial. The government permits human rights monitors to visit prisons, which are severely overcrowded.

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Cite this webpage as: Patt, Prof. Martin, "Torture by Police, Forced Disappearance & Other Ill Treatment in the early years of the 21st Century- Trinidad & Tobago ", http://gvnet.com/torture/Trinidad&Tobago.htm, [accessed <date>]

 

 

Torture in [Trinidad & Tobago] [other countries]
Human Trafficking in [Trinidad & Tobago] [other countries]
Street Children in [Trinidad & Tobago] [other countries]
Child Prostitution in [Trinidad & Tobago] [other countries]