Torture in [Suriname] [other countries]
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Street Children in [Suriname] [other countries]
Child Prostitution in [Suriname] [other countries]
 

Torture by Police, Forced Disappearance

& Other Ill Treatment

In the early years of the 21st Century gvnet.com/torture/Suriname.htm

Republic of Suriname

The economy is dominated by the mining industry, with exports of alumina, gold, and oil accounting for about 85% of exports and 25% of government revenues, making the economy highly vulnerable to mineral price volatility.

In 2000, the government of Ronald Venetiaan, returned to office and inherited an economy with inflation of over 100% and a growing fiscal deficit. He quickly implemented an austerity program, raised taxes, attempted to control spending, and tamed inflation. The Venetiaan administration also has created a stabilization fund to insulate future revenue from commodity shocks. [The World Factbook, U.S.C.I.A. 2009]

Description: Description: Suriname

CAUTION:  The following links have been culled from the web to illuminate the situation in Suriname. Some of these links may lead to websites that present allegations that are unsubstantiated or even false.  No attempt has been made to validate their authenticity or to verify their content.

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Resolution N 1/85, Case N 9265, Suriname

Inter-American commission on Human Rights, Oorganization of American States, July 1st. 1985

www.cidh.org/annualrep/84.85eng/Suriname9265.htm

[accessed 10 Feb 2014]

BACKGROUND - 6. On January 9, 1985 a special commission of the IACHR interviewed certain eyewitnesses to the detention of the subjects of this case and heard testimony to the effect that they were tortured at the outset of their incarceration, in some cases lasting several months, and effectively denied legal counsel until the day before their trials in July of 1984, more than seven months after their arrest. The tortures included severe beatings over their entire bodies including their sex organs. These usually took place at night either in Fort Zeelandia or Membre Boekoe Kazerne. Specific mistreatment also included the placing of a chair leg on the victims's outstretched hand while the torturer jumped on the chair. Another technique consisted of forcing the prisoner to drink a liquid that burned the drinker's throat. The torture also included punches, kicks and beatings with clubs and rifle butts. The Commission saw evidence on a number of the victims of broken teeth, noses, legs, collarbones and assorted scars. One had been tied to a car and dragged. Several had been forced to sign confessions.

Psychological torture included the firing of machine guns at the victims' feet. Threats were also made against the wives, mothers and other relatives of the victims. On one occasion several of the victims were forced to lie in freshly dug graves in a local cemetery and threatened with summary execution. One of the victims was subject to an attempted homosexual rape by a military policeman.

Human Rights Reports 2005 Country Reports on Human Rights Practices

U.S. Dept of State Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor, March 8, 2006

www.state.gov/g/drl/rls/hrrpt/2005/61742.htm

[accessed 12 February 2013]

TORTURE AND OTHER CRUEL, INHUMAN, OR DEGRADING TREATMENT OR PUNISHMENT While the law prohibits such practices, human rights groups continued to express concern about official mistreatment and documented cases of police mistreatment of detainees, particularly during arrests, and abuse of prisoners by prison officials.

Through November citizens filed 279 complaints with the OPZ, the majority of which were for physical mistreatment and neglect of duty (see section 1.d.). In January the minister of justice and police established a new Reporting Unit for Police Conduct, but the unit does not publicly disclose the number of inquiries received. The authorities arrested 53 officers and disciplined 151 for various offenses, including brutality; 7 officers were incarcerated, 21 were suspended, and 21 were fired. According to human rights groups, inadequate training of police officers serving as the jailers at local detention facilities contributed to the abuses.

Freedom House Country Report - Political Rights: 2 Civil Liberties: 2 Status: Free

2009 Edition

www.freedomhouse.org/report/freedom-world/2009/suriname

[accessed 12 February 2013]

The judiciary is susceptible to political influence and suffers from a significant shortage of judges and a large backlog of cases. The courts and prisons are seriously overburdened by the volume of people detained for narcotics trafficking. Police abuse detainees, particularly during arrests, and prison guards mistreat inmates.

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Cite this webpage as: Patt, Prof. Martin, "Torture by Police, Forced Disappearance & Other Ill Treatment in the early years of the 21st Century- Suriname", http://gvnet.com/torture/Suriname.htm, [accessed <date>]

 

 

Torture in [Suriname] [other countries]
Human Trafficking in [Suriname] [other countries]
Street Children in [Suriname] [other countries]
Child Prostitution in [Suriname] [other countries]