Human Trafficking & Modern-day Slavery

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Rehabilitation

 

*** FEATURED ARTICLES ***

# General #

Little Known About Men, Child Trafficking Victims

Joe DeCapua, Voice of America VOA News, 30 May 2012

www.voanews.com/content/decapua-human-trafficking-30may12/1134153.html

[accessed 31 May 2012]

LITTLE IS KNOWN - Many men become forced laborers in fields or fishing boats. Many children may be recruited into armed groups, sexually exploited or used in the illegal drug trade. Asked how much is known about how they’re affected, Oram said, “Really not very much at all. We didn’t find any studies that reported on the health of trafficked men. And we really only found a couple that reported on trafficked children, and they were very limited.”

Oram isn’t sure why so little is known, but she said it means little is being done to help them.

“I think it really means that when we’re looking to work with trafficked men and trafficked children to support their needs and help them recover from their experiences, we can’t do that in a way that’s informed by the evidence there, because the evidence just isn’t there,” she said.

 

 

*** ARCHIVES ***

# General #

Little Known About Men, Child Trafficking Victims

Joe DeCapua, Voice of America VOA News, 30 May 2012

www.voanews.com/content/decapua-human-trafficking-30may12/1134153.html

[accessed 31 May 2012]

LITTLE IS KNOWN - Many men become forced laborers in fields or fishing boats. Many children may be recruited into armed groups, sexually exploited or used in the illegal drug trade. Asked how much is known about how they’re affected, Oram said, “Really not very much at all. We didn’t find any studies that reported on the health of trafficked men. And we really only found a couple that reported on trafficked children, and they were very limited.”

Oram isn’t sure why so little is known, but she said it means little is being done to help them.

“I think it really means that when we’re looking to work with trafficked men and trafficked children to support their needs and help them recover from their experiences, we can’t do that in a way that’s informed by the evidence there, because the evidence just isn’t there,” she said.

 

 

# General #

Prevalence and Risk of Violence and the Physical, Mental, and Sexual Health Problems Associated with Human Trafficking: Systematic Review

Oram S, Stöckl H, Busza J, Howard LM, Zimmerman C (2012) . PLoS Med 9(5): e1001224. doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.1001224

www.plosmedicine.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pmed.1001224

[accessed 31 May 2012]

WHY WAS THIS STUDY DONE? - To date, the health consequences and public health implications of human trafficking have received little international attention, partly because not much is known about this area. So in this study, the researchers examined published studies in order to assimilate evidence and information on the prevalence of all forms of violence relating to people who have been trafficked and the prevalence of physical, mental, and sexual health problems, including HIV/AIDS, among this group.

WHAT DID THE RESEARCHERS DO AND FIND? - The researchers searched the published literature for suitable studies by conducting a comprehensive key word search of key databases and by contacting experts. The researchers did not exclude any type of study from their search but used stringent criteria to identify appropriate studies and then assessed the quality of identified studies by using a critical appraisal tool.

Using this process, the researchers initially identified 407 papers but only 19 were suitable for their analysis, representing 16 different studies. The majority (11) of these studies were conducted in Asia (Nepal, India, Thailand, and Cambodia), and all studies focused solely on women and girls, with all but two studies examining sexual exploitation only.

 

 

Canada

Human Trafficking May Be Closer to Home Than We Think

2008-04-21  - Source: miramichileader.canadaeast.com/front/article/271131

www.antitraf.net/home.php?mode=more&id=44&lang=en

[accessed 27 January 2011]

INTERNATIONAL TRAFFICKING - The good news for people who have been tricked into slavery is that once they go to police they do not need to fear being exported.

They are given a Temporary Resident Permit, which includes health care, and they are fed and sheltered and given an opportunity to apply for citizenship later.

MacIver has interviewed the victims of such crimes and tries to provide them with counsellors so they can open up about their experiences."

 

 

India

Giving flesh trade survivors a life of dignity

Dilnaz Boga, Daily News & Analysis DNA,  Mumbai, 11 June 2012

www.dnaindia.com/mumbai/report_giving-flesh-trade-survivors-a-life-of-dignity_1700697

[accessed 11 June 2012]

Like the 140 others like her, Reema was trained by experts handpicked by SCI for starting a new life post-rescue from a brothel. “Apart from rescuing girls from brothels, we give vocational training to the freed girls ending up in state homes, like the two at Deonar, between 10am and 5pm,” says SCI CEO Dr Subhadra Anand. At a time a batch of 20 to 25 girls are brought to Sahas Kendra, the rehabilitation centre at Bandra-Kurla complex, and imparted training hospitality, computer graphics, tailoring, nursing and housekeeping, to name a few, says legal consultant Nandini Thakkar, also a programme manager at SCI.

After working as a trainee in the hospitality sector, Reema went on to become a trainer of supervisors within four years. “Her success story, like many others’ here, was all about empowerment and independence,” says Thakkar. After three months, we identify the survivor’s skills and conduct a career test, which helps in deciding her vocation. “Following this, we start training and counselling them for placements later. A year down the line, the girls don’t need us anymore,” explains Thakkar.

 

 

Sierra Leone

Sierra Leone haunted by 'silent war crimes'

Victoria Brittain, The Guardian, 16 January 2003

www.guardian.co.uk/world/2003/jan/16/sierraleone.westafrica

[accessed 22 December 2010]

Unknown numbers of the thousands of women and girls abducted by the rebels still remain with their "husbands" in conditions of sexual slavery, although the war was declared over a year ago, HRW reports.  There has been no accountability for the thousands of crimes of sexual violence, and a climate of impunity persists, the report says, allowing the perpetrators of sexual violence (as well as other crimes) to escape justice.  Survivors of rape and other sexual crimes - some boys as well as the thousands of women and girls - need "drastically increased funding for trauma counselling, health, education and skills training", according to HRW.

 

 

Thailand

Thai Government and International Organizations Pledge Cooperation to Provide Assistance to Victims

humantrafficking.org, News & Updates,  04 June 2007 -- Adapted from: "Trading in People: To ensure adults and children trafficked in Thailand receive help, state and international agencies have signed an agreement to not discriminate between victims." The Bangkok Post (Outlook), 21 May 2007 (edited). (Source: UNIAP Thailand)

www.humantrafficking.org/updates/653

[accessed 29 December 2010]

When she finally managed to escape, she rushed to a policeman for help. But worse was to come. The woman was deported and was left to find her way home from the Thai border. Walking through the jungle, she was repeatedly raped by groups of Karen guerrillas. Traumatised and lost, she was eventually rescued by a stranger who took her to a refugee camp in Mae Hong Son, from where she was sent to Suan Prung Mental Hospital in Chiang Mai when camp staff realised she had lost her mind.

While poor women from neighbouring countries enter Thailand in pursuit of work, many Thai women head overseas for the same reason. And many end up in similarly hellish conditions, said psychologist Pornsri Boonthanasathit who has worked with many victims of human trafficking.

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